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Changes in the lipoprotein profile in postmenopausal women receiving hormone replacement therapy. Effects of natural and synthetic progesterone.
J Reprod Med. 1998 Jul; 43(7):568-74.JR

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare the effects of medroxyprogesterone acetate and micronized progesterone on the lipid profile of postmenopausal women receiving conjugated equine estrogen.

STUDY DESIGN

A prospective, clinical study of the changes in lipoprotein profile evaluated in 123 postmenopausal women receiving conjugated estrogen alone (group I), conjugated estrogen combined with medroxyprogesterone acetate (group II) or micronized progesterone (group III) before treatment and six months after.

RESULTS

Group I had significantly increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels (14.4%) after six months as well as decreased low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) concentrations (-6.61%), LDL/HDL and total cholesterol/HDL-C ratios (P < .05). In groups II and III, HDL-C concentrations increased 4.58% and 5.44%, respectively, after six months. LDL-C levels were markedly decreased in group II (8.98%). There was no significant reduction in LDL-C levels in group III. Total cholesterol levels were significantly decreased only in group II (-4.93%). Triglyceride levels were increased with statistical significance only in group III (21.2%, P < .05). LDL/HDL and total cholesterol/ HDL-C ratios were significantly decreased in group II, and this effect was more pronounced in group I. There was no change in the ratios in group III.

CONCLUSION

Conjugated estrogen replacement therapy had a persistent cardioprotective effect in postmenopausal women, based on the positive effect on lipoprotein metabolism. Both natural and synthetic progesterones blunt the beneficial effects of estrogen on the lipoprotein profile, and micronized progesterone is not superior to medroxyprogesterone acetate.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Keelung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan, R.O.C.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9693406

Citation

Chen, F P., et al. "Changes in the Lipoprotein Profile in Postmenopausal Women Receiving Hormone Replacement Therapy. Effects of Natural and Synthetic Progesterone." The Journal of Reproductive Medicine, vol. 43, no. 7, 1998, pp. 568-74.
Chen FP, Lee N, Soong YK. Changes in the lipoprotein profile in postmenopausal women receiving hormone replacement therapy. Effects of natural and synthetic progesterone. J Reprod Med. 1998;43(7):568-74.
Chen, F. P., Lee, N., & Soong, Y. K. (1998). Changes in the lipoprotein profile in postmenopausal women receiving hormone replacement therapy. Effects of natural and synthetic progesterone. The Journal of Reproductive Medicine, 43(7), 568-74.
Chen FP, Lee N, Soong YK. Changes in the Lipoprotein Profile in Postmenopausal Women Receiving Hormone Replacement Therapy. Effects of Natural and Synthetic Progesterone. J Reprod Med. 1998;43(7):568-74. PubMed PMID: 9693406.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Changes in the lipoprotein profile in postmenopausal women receiving hormone replacement therapy. Effects of natural and synthetic progesterone. AU - Chen,F P, AU - Lee,N, AU - Soong,Y K, PY - 1998/8/7/pubmed PY - 1998/8/7/medline PY - 1998/8/7/entrez SP - 568 EP - 74 JF - The Journal of reproductive medicine JO - J Reprod Med VL - 43 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of medroxyprogesterone acetate and micronized progesterone on the lipid profile of postmenopausal women receiving conjugated equine estrogen. STUDY DESIGN: A prospective, clinical study of the changes in lipoprotein profile evaluated in 123 postmenopausal women receiving conjugated estrogen alone (group I), conjugated estrogen combined with medroxyprogesterone acetate (group II) or micronized progesterone (group III) before treatment and six months after. RESULTS: Group I had significantly increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels (14.4%) after six months as well as decreased low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) concentrations (-6.61%), LDL/HDL and total cholesterol/HDL-C ratios (P < .05). In groups II and III, HDL-C concentrations increased 4.58% and 5.44%, respectively, after six months. LDL-C levels were markedly decreased in group II (8.98%). There was no significant reduction in LDL-C levels in group III. Total cholesterol levels were significantly decreased only in group II (-4.93%). Triglyceride levels were increased with statistical significance only in group III (21.2%, P < .05). LDL/HDL and total cholesterol/ HDL-C ratios were significantly decreased in group II, and this effect was more pronounced in group I. There was no change in the ratios in group III. CONCLUSION: Conjugated estrogen replacement therapy had a persistent cardioprotective effect in postmenopausal women, based on the positive effect on lipoprotein metabolism. Both natural and synthetic progesterones blunt the beneficial effects of estrogen on the lipoprotein profile, and micronized progesterone is not superior to medroxyprogesterone acetate. SN - 0024-7758 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9693406/Changes_in_the_lipoprotein_profile_in_postmenopausal_women_receiving_hormone_replacement_therapy__Effects_of_natural_and_synthetic_progesterone_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -