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Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug use and gallstone disease prevalence: a case-control study.
Am J Gastroenterol 1998; 93(9):1420-4AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Conflicting results on the relationship between gallstone disease and the use of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been reported, but studies on the effect of NSAID use in populations not selected on the basis of a high risk for gallstone development are still lacking.

METHODS

We conducted a case-control study involving 216 patients, regular NSAID users (43 men and 173 women) consecutively admitted to a rheumatology department, suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (n = 147), osteoarthritis (n = 49), and ankylosing spondylitis (n = 20). Two-hundred sixteen patients who were not NSAID users, matched for gender, age, and body mass index, consecutively admitted to a medical department for various medical pathologies, acted as a control group. All patients underwent upper abdomen ultrasonography.

RESULTS

The overall prevalence of gallstones was similar in the two groups: 24.0% in NSAID users (15.7% actual stones and 8.3% previous cholecystectomy) and 21.3% in controls (13.9% gallstones and 7.4% cholecystectomy). The prevalence of gallstone disease was significantly higher in women than in men, and the mean age was higher in gallstone patients than in gallstone-free patients, in both groups. No significant differences in type and duration of arthritis condition, type and dose of NSAID taken, and duration of treatment between gallstone patients and gallstone-free patients were found. On logistic regression analysis only female gender, aging, and family history of gallstone disease were significantly associated with the presence of gallstones, whereas no relationship between NSAID use and gallstone disease was found.

CONCLUSIONS

Chronic NSAID ingestion does not seem to prevent gallstones in arthritis patients; in these patients gallstone disease is associated with classic risk factors (female gender and age).

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Department of Gastroenterology, St. Anna Hospital, Ferrara, Italy.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9732918

Citation

Pazzi, P, et al. "Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drug Use and Gallstone Disease Prevalence: a Case-control Study." The American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 93, no. 9, 1998, pp. 1420-4.
Pazzi P, Scagliarini R, Sighinolfi D, et al. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug use and gallstone disease prevalence: a case-control study. Am J Gastroenterol. 1998;93(9):1420-4.
Pazzi, P., Scagliarini, R., Sighinolfi, D., Govoni, M., La Corte, R., & Gullini, S. (1998). Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug use and gallstone disease prevalence: a case-control study. The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 93(9), pp. 1420-4.
Pazzi P, et al. Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drug Use and Gallstone Disease Prevalence: a Case-control Study. Am J Gastroenterol. 1998;93(9):1420-4. PubMed PMID: 9732918.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug use and gallstone disease prevalence: a case-control study. AU - Pazzi,P, AU - Scagliarini,R, AU - Sighinolfi,D, AU - Govoni,M, AU - La Corte,R, AU - Gullini,S, PY - 1998/9/11/pubmed PY - 1998/9/11/medline PY - 1998/9/11/entrez SP - 1420 EP - 4 JF - The American journal of gastroenterology JO - Am. J. Gastroenterol. VL - 93 IS - 9 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Conflicting results on the relationship between gallstone disease and the use of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been reported, but studies on the effect of NSAID use in populations not selected on the basis of a high risk for gallstone development are still lacking. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study involving 216 patients, regular NSAID users (43 men and 173 women) consecutively admitted to a rheumatology department, suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (n = 147), osteoarthritis (n = 49), and ankylosing spondylitis (n = 20). Two-hundred sixteen patients who were not NSAID users, matched for gender, age, and body mass index, consecutively admitted to a medical department for various medical pathologies, acted as a control group. All patients underwent upper abdomen ultrasonography. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of gallstones was similar in the two groups: 24.0% in NSAID users (15.7% actual stones and 8.3% previous cholecystectomy) and 21.3% in controls (13.9% gallstones and 7.4% cholecystectomy). The prevalence of gallstone disease was significantly higher in women than in men, and the mean age was higher in gallstone patients than in gallstone-free patients, in both groups. No significant differences in type and duration of arthritis condition, type and dose of NSAID taken, and duration of treatment between gallstone patients and gallstone-free patients were found. On logistic regression analysis only female gender, aging, and family history of gallstone disease were significantly associated with the presence of gallstones, whereas no relationship between NSAID use and gallstone disease was found. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic NSAID ingestion does not seem to prevent gallstones in arthritis patients; in these patients gallstone disease is associated with classic risk factors (female gender and age). SN - 0002-9270 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9732918/Nonsteroidal_antiinflammatory_drug_use_and_gallstone_disease_prevalence:_a_case_control_study_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=9732918 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -