Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Increasing amounts of dietary fiber provided by foods normalizes physiologic response of the large bowel without altering calcium balance or fecal steroid excretion.
Am J Clin Nutr. 1998 Sep; 68(3):615-22.AJ

Abstract

Nine healthy, young men consumed constant diets to determine selected large-bowel, serum cholesterol and triacylglycerol, and calcium balance responses to 3 amounts of fiber provided by a mixture of fruit, vegetables, and grains. The diets, each consumed for 1 mo, contained 16, 30, and 42 g total fiber/d, of which 2.9, 4.8, and 7.7 g, respectively, was soluble. Mean daily wet and dry stool weights increased with each fiber addition. The first fiber addition increased defecation frequency and decreased fecal pH, bile acid concentration, and neutral steroid concentration; the second addition had no further effect. Mean weight of each defecation and stool moisture did not increase and serum cholesterol and triacylglycerol concentrations, calcium balance, and gastrointestinal transit time did not decrease as fiber intake increased. We conclude that 1) fiber provided by a mixed-food diet increases stool weight as effectively as does wheat or oat bran; 2) even high amounts of dietary fiber do not change transit time or defecation frequency if they are already approximately 1 and 2-3 d, respectively; 3) food patterns consistent with the food pyramid and incorporating legumes and whole grains are necessary to achieve recommended fiber intakes of 20-35 g/d, even if energy intake is > 12.55 MJ (3000 kcal); 4) soluble fiber provided by a mixture of whole foods has no effect on serum cholesterol concentrations or output of fecal bile acids; and 5) mixed-food fiber has little effect on calcium balance when calcium intakes are high (> or = 1.5 g/d).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 53706, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9734738

Citation

Haack, V S., et al. "Increasing Amounts of Dietary Fiber Provided By Foods Normalizes Physiologic Response of the Large Bowel Without Altering Calcium Balance or Fecal Steroid Excretion." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 68, no. 3, 1998, pp. 615-22.
Haack VS, Chesters JG, Vollendorf NW, et al. Increasing amounts of dietary fiber provided by foods normalizes physiologic response of the large bowel without altering calcium balance or fecal steroid excretion. Am J Clin Nutr. 1998;68(3):615-22.
Haack, V. S., Chesters, J. G., Vollendorf, N. W., Story, J. A., & Marlett, J. A. (1998). Increasing amounts of dietary fiber provided by foods normalizes physiologic response of the large bowel without altering calcium balance or fecal steroid excretion. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 68(3), 615-22.
Haack VS, et al. Increasing Amounts of Dietary Fiber Provided By Foods Normalizes Physiologic Response of the Large Bowel Without Altering Calcium Balance or Fecal Steroid Excretion. Am J Clin Nutr. 1998;68(3):615-22. PubMed PMID: 9734738.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Increasing amounts of dietary fiber provided by foods normalizes physiologic response of the large bowel without altering calcium balance or fecal steroid excretion. AU - Haack,V S, AU - Chesters,J G, AU - Vollendorf,N W, AU - Story,J A, AU - Marlett,J A, PY - 1998/9/12/pubmed PY - 1998/9/12/medline PY - 1998/9/12/entrez SP - 615 EP - 22 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 68 IS - 3 N2 - Nine healthy, young men consumed constant diets to determine selected large-bowel, serum cholesterol and triacylglycerol, and calcium balance responses to 3 amounts of fiber provided by a mixture of fruit, vegetables, and grains. The diets, each consumed for 1 mo, contained 16, 30, and 42 g total fiber/d, of which 2.9, 4.8, and 7.7 g, respectively, was soluble. Mean daily wet and dry stool weights increased with each fiber addition. The first fiber addition increased defecation frequency and decreased fecal pH, bile acid concentration, and neutral steroid concentration; the second addition had no further effect. Mean weight of each defecation and stool moisture did not increase and serum cholesterol and triacylglycerol concentrations, calcium balance, and gastrointestinal transit time did not decrease as fiber intake increased. We conclude that 1) fiber provided by a mixed-food diet increases stool weight as effectively as does wheat or oat bran; 2) even high amounts of dietary fiber do not change transit time or defecation frequency if they are already approximately 1 and 2-3 d, respectively; 3) food patterns consistent with the food pyramid and incorporating legumes and whole grains are necessary to achieve recommended fiber intakes of 20-35 g/d, even if energy intake is > 12.55 MJ (3000 kcal); 4) soluble fiber provided by a mixture of whole foods has no effect on serum cholesterol concentrations or output of fecal bile acids; and 5) mixed-food fiber has little effect on calcium balance when calcium intakes are high (> or = 1.5 g/d). SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9734738/Increasing_amounts_of_dietary_fiber_provided_by_foods_normalizes_physiologic_response_of_the_large_bowel_without_altering_calcium_balance_or_fecal_steroid_excretion_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/68.3.615 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -