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Oesophageal dysmotility is not associated with poor outcome after laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication.
Br J Surg 1998; 85(9):1290-3BJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Nissen fundoplication has become the standard operation in the surgical management of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Postoperative dysphagia is thought to occur more commonly in patients with oesophageal dysmotility and it has been recommended that fundoplication be modified or avoided in these patients. The aim of this study was to determine the outcome of patients with normal motility and dysmotility undergoing laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication.

METHODS

This was a single-centre prospective cohort study with 1-year follow-up, using dysphagia as the main outcome variable. Of 81 patients who underwent laparoscopic surgery, 48 had normal motility and 33 had oesophageal dysmotility (defined as percentage peristalsis, using ten wet swallows, of 50 per cent or less and/or a mean distal pressure of less than 40 mmHg).

RESULTS

Dysphagia was present before operation in 14 of 48 patients with normal motility and 15 of 33 in the dysmotility group (P=0.2). At 3-month follow-up, new or worse dysphagia was present in 13 of 48 patients in the normal group and four of 33 in the dysmotility group (P=0.17). At 1 year the incidence of dysphagia was six of 48 in the normal group and five of 33 in the dysmotility group (P=0.9).

CONCLUSION

Preoperative manometric assessment of oesophageal motility does not correlate with postoperative outcome, and oesophageal dysmotility should not be regarded as a contraindication to laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Surgery, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9752880

Citation

Beckingham, I J., et al. "Oesophageal Dysmotility Is Not Associated With Poor Outcome After Laparoscopic Nissen Fundoplication." The British Journal of Surgery, vol. 85, no. 9, 1998, pp. 1290-3.
Beckingham IJ, Cariem AK, Bornman PC, et al. Oesophageal dysmotility is not associated with poor outcome after laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication. Br J Surg. 1998;85(9):1290-3.
Beckingham, I. J., Cariem, A. K., Bornman, P. C., Callanan, M. D., & Louw, J. A. (1998). Oesophageal dysmotility is not associated with poor outcome after laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication. The British Journal of Surgery, 85(9), pp. 1290-3.
Beckingham IJ, et al. Oesophageal Dysmotility Is Not Associated With Poor Outcome After Laparoscopic Nissen Fundoplication. Br J Surg. 1998;85(9):1290-3. PubMed PMID: 9752880.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Oesophageal dysmotility is not associated with poor outcome after laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication. AU - Beckingham,I J, AU - Cariem,A K, AU - Bornman,P C, AU - Callanan,M D, AU - Louw,J A, PY - 1998/9/30/pubmed PY - 1998/9/30/medline PY - 1998/9/30/entrez SP - 1290 EP - 3 JF - The British journal of surgery JO - Br J Surg VL - 85 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Nissen fundoplication has become the standard operation in the surgical management of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Postoperative dysphagia is thought to occur more commonly in patients with oesophageal dysmotility and it has been recommended that fundoplication be modified or avoided in these patients. The aim of this study was to determine the outcome of patients with normal motility and dysmotility undergoing laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication. METHODS: This was a single-centre prospective cohort study with 1-year follow-up, using dysphagia as the main outcome variable. Of 81 patients who underwent laparoscopic surgery, 48 had normal motility and 33 had oesophageal dysmotility (defined as percentage peristalsis, using ten wet swallows, of 50 per cent or less and/or a mean distal pressure of less than 40 mmHg). RESULTS: Dysphagia was present before operation in 14 of 48 patients with normal motility and 15 of 33 in the dysmotility group (P=0.2). At 3-month follow-up, new or worse dysphagia was present in 13 of 48 patients in the normal group and four of 33 in the dysmotility group (P=0.17). At 1 year the incidence of dysphagia was six of 48 in the normal group and five of 33 in the dysmotility group (P=0.9). CONCLUSION: Preoperative manometric assessment of oesophageal motility does not correlate with postoperative outcome, and oesophageal dysmotility should not be regarded as a contraindication to laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication. SN - 0007-1323 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9752880/Oesophageal_dysmotility_is_not_associated_with_poor_outcome_after_laparoscopic_Nissen_fundoplication_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0007-1323&date=1998&volume=85&issue=9&spage=1290 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -