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Small-intestinal bacterial overgrowth in patients with liver cirrhosis, diagnosed with glucose H2 or CH4 breath tests.
Scand J Gastroenterol 1998; 33(8):867-71SJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Small-intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) has been considered a predisposing factor of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in cirrhotic patients by bacterial translocation or hematogenous spread during spontaneous bacteremia. We investigated 45 cirrhotic patients and 28 healthy subjects to assess the prevalence of SIBO and its relationship with the severity of liver dysfunction and the presence of ascites.

METHODS

Bacterial overgrowth was measured by the glucose hydrogen and methane breath test.

RESULTS

SIBO was documented in 16 (35.6%) of the 45 cirrhotic patients and in 1 (3.6%) of the 28 healthy controls. The prevalence of SIBO was significantly higher in patients with Child-Pugh class B or C (50%) than in those with class A (19%) and had no relationship with the presence or absence of ascites.

CONCLUSIONS

We conclude that the prevalence of SIBO in cirrhotic patients is approximately 35.6% and that it is related to the severity of liver disease. There was no difference among various causes of cirrhosis, such as viral, alcoholic, or idiopathic.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Dept. of Internal Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9754736

Citation

Yang, C Y., et al. "Small-intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth in Patients With Liver Cirrhosis, Diagnosed With Glucose H2 or CH4 Breath Tests." Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 33, no. 8, 1998, pp. 867-71.
Yang CY, Chang CS, Chen GH. Small-intestinal bacterial overgrowth in patients with liver cirrhosis, diagnosed with glucose H2 or CH4 breath tests. Scand J Gastroenterol. 1998;33(8):867-71.
Yang, C. Y., Chang, C. S., & Chen, G. H. (1998). Small-intestinal bacterial overgrowth in patients with liver cirrhosis, diagnosed with glucose H2 or CH4 breath tests. Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, 33(8), pp. 867-71.
Yang CY, Chang CS, Chen GH. Small-intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth in Patients With Liver Cirrhosis, Diagnosed With Glucose H2 or CH4 Breath Tests. Scand J Gastroenterol. 1998;33(8):867-71. PubMed PMID: 9754736.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Small-intestinal bacterial overgrowth in patients with liver cirrhosis, diagnosed with glucose H2 or CH4 breath tests. AU - Yang,C Y, AU - Chang,C S, AU - Chen,G H, PY - 1998/10/1/pubmed PY - 1998/10/1/medline PY - 1998/10/1/entrez SP - 867 EP - 71 JF - Scandinavian journal of gastroenterology JO - Scand. J. Gastroenterol. VL - 33 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: Small-intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) has been considered a predisposing factor of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in cirrhotic patients by bacterial translocation or hematogenous spread during spontaneous bacteremia. We investigated 45 cirrhotic patients and 28 healthy subjects to assess the prevalence of SIBO and its relationship with the severity of liver dysfunction and the presence of ascites. METHODS: Bacterial overgrowth was measured by the glucose hydrogen and methane breath test. RESULTS: SIBO was documented in 16 (35.6%) of the 45 cirrhotic patients and in 1 (3.6%) of the 28 healthy controls. The prevalence of SIBO was significantly higher in patients with Child-Pugh class B or C (50%) than in those with class A (19%) and had no relationship with the presence or absence of ascites. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that the prevalence of SIBO in cirrhotic patients is approximately 35.6% and that it is related to the severity of liver disease. There was no difference among various causes of cirrhosis, such as viral, alcoholic, or idiopathic. SN - 0036-5521 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9754736/Small_intestinal_bacterial_overgrowth_in_patients_with_liver_cirrhosis_diagnosed_with_glucose_H2_or_CH4_breath_tests_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00365529850171549 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -