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Comparison of effects of ascorbic acid on endothelium-dependent vasodilation in patients with chronic congestive heart failure secondary to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy versus patients with effort angina pectoris secondary to coronary artery disease.
Am J Cardiol. 1998 Sep 15; 82(6):762-7.AJ

Abstract

Impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation has been reported to play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases such as coronary artery disease (CAD) and congestive heart failure (CHF). However, the precise mechanism of endothelial dysfunction has not been elucidated in these conditions. To evaluate the role of oxidative stress in endothelial dysfunction, the effect of antioxidant ascorbic acid on brachial flow-mediated, endothelium-dependent vasodilation during reactive hyperemia and nitroglycerin-induced endothelium-independent vasodilation was examined with high resolution ultrasound in 12 patients with CHF caused by idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy without established coronary atherosclerosis and in 10 patients with CAD. Flow-mediated vasodilation in CHF (4.4+/-0.5%) and CAD (4.0 - 0.8%) was significantly (p <0.05) attenuated compared with that in 10 control subjects (9.6+/-0.9%). However, nitroglycerin-induced vasodilation was similar in 3 groups (13.7+/-1.3% in control, 13.9+/-1.1% in CHF, 12.7+/-1.4% in CAD). Ascorbic acid could significantly improve flow-mediated vasodilation only in patients with CAD (9.1+/-0.9%) but not with CHF (5.6+/-0.6%), and had no influence on nitroglycerin-induced vasodilation (13.6+/-1.1% in CHF, 14.0+/-1.3% in CAD). These results suggest that, in brachial circulation, augmented oxidative stress mainly leads to endothelial dysfunction in CAD but not in CHF caused by idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The First Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University School of Medicine, Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9761087

Citation

Ito, K, et al. "Comparison of Effects of Ascorbic Acid On Endothelium-dependent Vasodilation in Patients With Chronic Congestive Heart Failure Secondary to Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy Versus Patients With Effort Angina Pectoris Secondary to Coronary Artery Disease." The American Journal of Cardiology, vol. 82, no. 6, 1998, pp. 762-7.
Ito K, Akita H, Kanazawa K, et al. Comparison of effects of ascorbic acid on endothelium-dependent vasodilation in patients with chronic congestive heart failure secondary to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy versus patients with effort angina pectoris secondary to coronary artery disease. Am J Cardiol. 1998;82(6):762-7.
Ito, K., Akita, H., Kanazawa, K., Yamada, S., Terashima, M., Matsuda, Y., & Yokoyama, M. (1998). Comparison of effects of ascorbic acid on endothelium-dependent vasodilation in patients with chronic congestive heart failure secondary to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy versus patients with effort angina pectoris secondary to coronary artery disease. The American Journal of Cardiology, 82(6), 762-7.
Ito K, et al. Comparison of Effects of Ascorbic Acid On Endothelium-dependent Vasodilation in Patients With Chronic Congestive Heart Failure Secondary to Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy Versus Patients With Effort Angina Pectoris Secondary to Coronary Artery Disease. Am J Cardiol. 1998 Sep 15;82(6):762-7. PubMed PMID: 9761087.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Comparison of effects of ascorbic acid on endothelium-dependent vasodilation in patients with chronic congestive heart failure secondary to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy versus patients with effort angina pectoris secondary to coronary artery disease. AU - Ito,K, AU - Akita,H, AU - Kanazawa,K, AU - Yamada,S, AU - Terashima,M, AU - Matsuda,Y, AU - Yokoyama,M, PY - 1998/10/7/pubmed PY - 1998/10/7/medline PY - 1998/10/7/entrez SP - 762 EP - 7 JF - The American journal of cardiology JO - Am J Cardiol VL - 82 IS - 6 N2 - Impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation has been reported to play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases such as coronary artery disease (CAD) and congestive heart failure (CHF). However, the precise mechanism of endothelial dysfunction has not been elucidated in these conditions. To evaluate the role of oxidative stress in endothelial dysfunction, the effect of antioxidant ascorbic acid on brachial flow-mediated, endothelium-dependent vasodilation during reactive hyperemia and nitroglycerin-induced endothelium-independent vasodilation was examined with high resolution ultrasound in 12 patients with CHF caused by idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy without established coronary atherosclerosis and in 10 patients with CAD. Flow-mediated vasodilation in CHF (4.4+/-0.5%) and CAD (4.0 - 0.8%) was significantly (p <0.05) attenuated compared with that in 10 control subjects (9.6+/-0.9%). However, nitroglycerin-induced vasodilation was similar in 3 groups (13.7+/-1.3% in control, 13.9+/-1.1% in CHF, 12.7+/-1.4% in CAD). Ascorbic acid could significantly improve flow-mediated vasodilation only in patients with CAD (9.1+/-0.9%) but not with CHF (5.6+/-0.6%), and had no influence on nitroglycerin-induced vasodilation (13.6+/-1.1% in CHF, 14.0+/-1.3% in CAD). These results suggest that, in brachial circulation, augmented oxidative stress mainly leads to endothelial dysfunction in CAD but not in CHF caused by idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. SN - 0002-9149 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9761087/Comparison_of_effects_of_ascorbic_acid_on_endothelium_dependent_vasodilation_in_patients_with_chronic_congestive_heart_failure_secondary_to_idiopathic_dilated_cardiomyopathy_versus_patients_with_effort_angina_pectoris_secondary_to_coronary_artery_disease_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002914998004494 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -