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Cardiovascular disease risk factors are lower in African-American vegans compared to lacto-ovo-vegetarians.
J Am Coll Nutr. 1998 Oct; 17(5):425-34.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This study was undertaken to determine if African-American strict vegetarians (vegans) exhibit lower blood pressure (BP) and a more favorable serum lipid profile than their lacto-ovo vegetarian (LOV) counterparts, and if plasma ascorbic acid (AA) concentrations could explain any group differences in these cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors.

METHODS

Habitual dietary intake, anthropometric characteristics, blood pressure, and blood lipids and ascorbic acid concentrations were determined in African-American study participants (male vegans, n = 14, age = 45.6 years; male LOV, n = 49, age = 49.8; female vegans, n = 31, age = 51.1, female LOV, n = 94, age = 52.1) recruited from Seventh-Day Adventist Churches in several cities in the northeastern United States.

RESULTS

Body mass index (BMI) was significantly lower in the vegans (24.7 +/- 1.9 kg/m2) compared to LOV (26.4 +/- 0.45 kg/m2). There were no diet or gender differences in BP. Serum total cholesterol (3.75 +/- 0.12 vs. 4.51 +/- 0.10 mmol/L), LDL-cholesterol (2.06 +/- 0.13 vs. 2.65 +/- 0.09 mmol/l), and triglycerides (0.94 +/- 0.07 vs. 1.17 +/- 0.04 mmol/L) were significantly (p < 0.05) lower in vegans compared to LOV, but there were no dietary group differences in HDL-C. The ratio of total to HDL-cholesterol was significantly lower in vegans than in LOV (3.0 +/- 0.13 vs. 3.7 +/- 0.13). There were no dietary group differences in plasma AA concentrations. However, in the entire sample, plasma AA was inversely associated with BP (SBP: r = -0.46, p < 0.001, DBP: r = -0.32, p < 0.001), but unrelated to the serum lipid concentrations.

CONCLUSION

African-American vegans exhibit a more favorable serum lipid profile than lacto-ovo-vegatarians and plasma AA is inversely related to BP in African-American vegetarians but does not explain any of the differences in CVD risk factors between vegans and lacto-ovo vegetarians.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Colorado State University, Ft. Collins 80523, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9791838

Citation

Toohey, M L., et al. "Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors Are Lower in African-American Vegans Compared to Lacto-ovo-vegetarians." Journal of the American College of Nutrition, vol. 17, no. 5, 1998, pp. 425-34.
Toohey ML, Harris MA, DeWitt W, et al. Cardiovascular disease risk factors are lower in African-American vegans compared to lacto-ovo-vegetarians. J Am Coll Nutr. 1998;17(5):425-34.
Toohey, M. L., Harris, M. A., DeWitt, W., Foster, G., Schmidt, W. D., & Melby, C. L. (1998). Cardiovascular disease risk factors are lower in African-American vegans compared to lacto-ovo-vegetarians. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 17(5), 425-34.
Toohey ML, et al. Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors Are Lower in African-American Vegans Compared to Lacto-ovo-vegetarians. J Am Coll Nutr. 1998;17(5):425-34. PubMed PMID: 9791838.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cardiovascular disease risk factors are lower in African-American vegans compared to lacto-ovo-vegetarians. AU - Toohey,M L, AU - Harris,M A, AU - DeWitt,W, AU - Foster,G, AU - Schmidt,W D, AU - Melby,C L, PY - 1998/10/29/pubmed PY - 1998/10/29/medline PY - 1998/10/29/entrez SP - 425 EP - 34 JF - Journal of the American College of Nutrition JO - J Am Coll Nutr VL - 17 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: This study was undertaken to determine if African-American strict vegetarians (vegans) exhibit lower blood pressure (BP) and a more favorable serum lipid profile than their lacto-ovo vegetarian (LOV) counterparts, and if plasma ascorbic acid (AA) concentrations could explain any group differences in these cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. METHODS: Habitual dietary intake, anthropometric characteristics, blood pressure, and blood lipids and ascorbic acid concentrations were determined in African-American study participants (male vegans, n = 14, age = 45.6 years; male LOV, n = 49, age = 49.8; female vegans, n = 31, age = 51.1, female LOV, n = 94, age = 52.1) recruited from Seventh-Day Adventist Churches in several cities in the northeastern United States. RESULTS: Body mass index (BMI) was significantly lower in the vegans (24.7 +/- 1.9 kg/m2) compared to LOV (26.4 +/- 0.45 kg/m2). There were no diet or gender differences in BP. Serum total cholesterol (3.75 +/- 0.12 vs. 4.51 +/- 0.10 mmol/L), LDL-cholesterol (2.06 +/- 0.13 vs. 2.65 +/- 0.09 mmol/l), and triglycerides (0.94 +/- 0.07 vs. 1.17 +/- 0.04 mmol/L) were significantly (p < 0.05) lower in vegans compared to LOV, but there were no dietary group differences in HDL-C. The ratio of total to HDL-cholesterol was significantly lower in vegans than in LOV (3.0 +/- 0.13 vs. 3.7 +/- 0.13). There were no dietary group differences in plasma AA concentrations. However, in the entire sample, plasma AA was inversely associated with BP (SBP: r = -0.46, p < 0.001, DBP: r = -0.32, p < 0.001), but unrelated to the serum lipid concentrations. CONCLUSION: African-American vegans exhibit a more favorable serum lipid profile than lacto-ovo-vegatarians and plasma AA is inversely related to BP in African-American vegetarians but does not explain any of the differences in CVD risk factors between vegans and lacto-ovo vegetarians. SN - 0731-5724 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9791838/Cardiovascular_disease_risk_factors_are_lower_in_African_American_vegans_compared_to_lacto_ovo_vegetarians_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07315724.1998.10718789 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -