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Aredia: the once-monthly infusion for the treatment of bone metastases.
Curr Opin Oncol. 1998 Aug; 10 Suppl 1:S1-5.CO

Abstract

Cancer cells produce a variety of cytokines that stimulate osteoclasts to resorb bone, leading to cancer-mediated destruction of the skeleton. Bisphosphonates, which are deposited on the surface of bone as a response to increased resorption, are potent inhibitors of this osleoclastic resorption. Several studies have suggested that bisphosphonate therapy can retard the formation of new bone metastases in patients with metastatic bone disease. First-generation bisphosphonates (etidronate and clodronate) were not suitable for long-term treatment and have now been superseded by second-generation bisphosphonates (pamidronate), which are more potent and do not have adverse effects on bone mineralization. Further generations of these drugs have now entered clinical trials.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, University Hospital, Hershey, PA 17033-0850, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9801852

Citation

Lipton, A. "Aredia: the Once-monthly Infusion for the Treatment of Bone Metastases." Current Opinion in Oncology, vol. 10 Suppl 1, 1998, pp. S1-5.
Lipton A. Aredia: the once-monthly infusion for the treatment of bone metastases. Curr Opin Oncol. 1998;10 Suppl 1:S1-5.
Lipton, A. (1998). Aredia: the once-monthly infusion for the treatment of bone metastases. Current Opinion in Oncology, 10 Suppl 1, S1-5.
Lipton A. Aredia: the Once-monthly Infusion for the Treatment of Bone Metastases. Curr Opin Oncol. 1998;10 Suppl 1:S1-5. PubMed PMID: 9801852.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Aredia: the once-monthly infusion for the treatment of bone metastases. A1 - Lipton,A, PY - 1998/11/5/pubmed PY - 1998/11/5/medline PY - 1998/11/5/entrez SP - S1 EP - 5 JF - Current opinion in oncology JO - Curr Opin Oncol VL - 10 Suppl 1 N2 - Cancer cells produce a variety of cytokines that stimulate osteoclasts to resorb bone, leading to cancer-mediated destruction of the skeleton. Bisphosphonates, which are deposited on the surface of bone as a response to increased resorption, are potent inhibitors of this osleoclastic resorption. Several studies have suggested that bisphosphonate therapy can retard the formation of new bone metastases in patients with metastatic bone disease. First-generation bisphosphonates (etidronate and clodronate) were not suitable for long-term treatment and have now been superseded by second-generation bisphosphonates (pamidronate), which are more potent and do not have adverse effects on bone mineralization. Further generations of these drugs have now entered clinical trials. SN - 1040-8746 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9801852/Aredia:_the_once_monthly_infusion_for_the_treatment_of_bone_metastases_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/bonecancer.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -