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[Food allergy. Most often conceals an inhalational allergy].
Praxis (Bern 1994) 1998; 87(40):1309-15P

Abstract

Food allergy (hypersensitivity) is a form of adverse food reaction in which the reaction is caused by an immunological response to a food. Most immediate allergic reactions to food are IgE-mediated. The prevalence of food allergy in the general population without the oral allergy syndrome is about 1-2%. Although many foods have been described to cause an allergic reaction, only a few are responsible for the majority of hypersensitivity symptoms. Based on continuous studies by B. Wüthrich, Allergy Unit of the Dermatology Department, University Hospital, Zurich, celery (42%) followed by dairy products (16%), carrot (13%), hen's egg (12%) and fish (7%) is by far the major source of food allergy in Switzerland. In adults food hypersensitivity is mainly due to cross-reactivity between inhalative and food allergens. Pathophysiologically, IgE antibodies induced by aeroallergens recognize structurally similar components in certain foods even from taxonomically unrelated plants. Following an accurate allergological examination, oral provocation tests are considered the most conclusive procedures to establish diagnosis. The only proven form of management in food allergy is strict elimination of the offending food. Food-allergic patients must be provided with emergency medications. Identification of allergens and their characterization finally will improve our understanding for pathophysiologic mechanisms of food allergy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institut für Immunologie und Allergologie, Allergologische-Immunologische Poliklinik, Inselspital Bern.

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article
Review

Language

ger

PubMed ID

9816924

Citation

Helbling, A. "[Food Allergy. Most Often Conceals an Inhalational Allergy]." Praxis, vol. 87, no. 40, 1998, pp. 1309-15.
Helbling A. [Food allergy. Most often conceals an inhalational allergy]. Praxis (Bern 1994). 1998;87(40):1309-15.
Helbling, A. (1998). [Food allergy. Most often conceals an inhalational allergy]. Praxis, 87(40), pp. 1309-15.
Helbling A. [Food Allergy. Most Often Conceals an Inhalational Allergy]. Praxis (Bern 1994). 1998 Sep 30;87(40):1309-15. PubMed PMID: 9816924.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Food allergy. Most often conceals an inhalational allergy]. A1 - Helbling,A, PY - 1998/11/17/pubmed PY - 1998/11/17/medline PY - 1998/11/17/entrez SP - 1309 EP - 15 JF - Praxis JO - Praxis (Bern 1994) VL - 87 IS - 40 N2 - Food allergy (hypersensitivity) is a form of adverse food reaction in which the reaction is caused by an immunological response to a food. Most immediate allergic reactions to food are IgE-mediated. The prevalence of food allergy in the general population without the oral allergy syndrome is about 1-2%. Although many foods have been described to cause an allergic reaction, only a few are responsible for the majority of hypersensitivity symptoms. Based on continuous studies by B. Wüthrich, Allergy Unit of the Dermatology Department, University Hospital, Zurich, celery (42%) followed by dairy products (16%), carrot (13%), hen's egg (12%) and fish (7%) is by far the major source of food allergy in Switzerland. In adults food hypersensitivity is mainly due to cross-reactivity between inhalative and food allergens. Pathophysiologically, IgE antibodies induced by aeroallergens recognize structurally similar components in certain foods even from taxonomically unrelated plants. Following an accurate allergological examination, oral provocation tests are considered the most conclusive procedures to establish diagnosis. The only proven form of management in food allergy is strict elimination of the offending food. Food-allergic patients must be provided with emergency medications. Identification of allergens and their characterization finally will improve our understanding for pathophysiologic mechanisms of food allergy. SN - 1661-8157 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9816924/[Food_allergy__Most_often_conceals_an_inhalational_allergy]_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/foodallergy.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -