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Antiretroviral uptake in Australia: medical, attitudinal and cultural correlates.
Int J STD AIDS. 1998 Oct; 9(10):579-86.IJ

Abstract

The objective of this study was to describe the medical, attitudinal and cultural correlates of antiretroviral uptake amongst people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in Australia. Stratified purposive sampling produced a sample of 925 PLWHA, which represents 8.3% of the current population of PLWHA in Australia. Respondents completed a self-administered questionnaire which revealed that 78% of respondents were using antiretroviral drugs for HIV/AIDS. Logistic regression revealed that PLWHA were more likely to use antiretroviral drugs if they had more favourable attitudes toward antiretroviral drugs, if they had been diagnosed with an AIDS-defining illness, and if they had ever had a CD4/T-cell count below 400 copies/ml blood. Women were less likely than men to use antiretroviral drugs, and logistic regression revealed different predictors of antiretroviral drug use amongst men and women. Given the importance of attitudes toward antiretroviral drugs, it is likely that if the current confidence in antiretroviral drugs were to change, this would be reflected in an equally rapid cessation of treatment amongst many PLWHA.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Centre in HIV Social Research: People Living with HIV/AIDS and their Carers, La Trobe University, Carlton South, Victoria, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9819107

Citation

Ezzy, D M., et al. "Antiretroviral Uptake in Australia: Medical, Attitudinal and Cultural Correlates." International Journal of STD & AIDS, vol. 9, no. 10, 1998, pp. 579-86.
Ezzy DM, Bartos MR, de Visser RO, et al. Antiretroviral uptake in Australia: medical, attitudinal and cultural correlates. Int J STD AIDS. 1998;9(10):579-86.
Ezzy, D. M., Bartos, M. R., de Visser, R. O., & Rosenthal, D. A. (1998). Antiretroviral uptake in Australia: medical, attitudinal and cultural correlates. International Journal of STD & AIDS, 9(10), 579-86.
Ezzy DM, et al. Antiretroviral Uptake in Australia: Medical, Attitudinal and Cultural Correlates. Int J STD AIDS. 1998;9(10):579-86. PubMed PMID: 9819107.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Antiretroviral uptake in Australia: medical, attitudinal and cultural correlates. AU - Ezzy,D M, AU - Bartos,M R, AU - de Visser,R O, AU - Rosenthal,D A, PY - 1998/11/18/pubmed PY - 1998/11/18/medline PY - 1998/11/18/entrez SP - 579 EP - 86 JF - International journal of STD & AIDS JO - Int J STD AIDS VL - 9 IS - 10 N2 - The objective of this study was to describe the medical, attitudinal and cultural correlates of antiretroviral uptake amongst people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in Australia. Stratified purposive sampling produced a sample of 925 PLWHA, which represents 8.3% of the current population of PLWHA in Australia. Respondents completed a self-administered questionnaire which revealed that 78% of respondents were using antiretroviral drugs for HIV/AIDS. Logistic regression revealed that PLWHA were more likely to use antiretroviral drugs if they had more favourable attitudes toward antiretroviral drugs, if they had been diagnosed with an AIDS-defining illness, and if they had ever had a CD4/T-cell count below 400 copies/ml blood. Women were less likely than men to use antiretroviral drugs, and logistic regression revealed different predictors of antiretroviral drug use amongst men and women. Given the importance of attitudes toward antiretroviral drugs, it is likely that if the current confidence in antiretroviral drugs were to change, this would be reflected in an equally rapid cessation of treatment amongst many PLWHA. SN - 0956-4624 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9819107/Antiretroviral_uptake_in_Australia:_medical_attitudinal_and_cultural_correlates_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1258/0956462981921152?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -