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Nephrolithiasis and risk of hypertension in women.

Abstract

Cross-sectional and prospective studies of men suggest a positive association between nephrolithiasis and hypertension. However, this association remains controversial in women. We conducted a prospective study of the relation between nephrolithiasis and the risk for hypertension in the Nurses' Health Study, a cohort of 89,376 women aged 34 to 59 years in 1980. Information on the history of nephrolithiasis, physician-diagnosed hypertension, and other relevant exposures was obtained by biennial mailed questionnaire. A history of nephrolithiasis before 1980 was reported by 2,558 women (2.9%), and a history of hypertension was reported by 11,883 women (13.3%). Among women without hypertension before 1980, 12,540 women reported a new diagnosis of hypertension between 1980 and 1992, during 711,039 person-years of follow-up. Compared with those without a history of nephrolithiasis, the age-adjusted relative risk (RR) for incident hypertension in women with such a history was 1.36 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20 to 1.43). After further adjustment for body mass index (BMI) and the intake of calcium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, caffeine, and alcohol, the RR was only slightly attenuated (RR=1.24; 95% CI, 1.13 to 1.37). In contrast, the occurrence of incident nephrolithiasis during follow-up was similar in women with hypertension at baseline compared with women without (adjusted odds ratio [OR]=1.01; 95% CI, 0.85 to 1.20). These data are consistent with the results obtained in men and support the hypothesis that a history of nephrolithiasis is associated with an increased risk for subsequent hypertension. Dietary factors, such as the intake of calcium, sodium, and potassium, do not explain this association. Unidentified pathogenic mechanisms common to nephrolithiasis and hypertension may be responsible for the development of both disorders.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

    , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Alcohol Drinking
    Body Mass Index
    Caffeine
    Calcium, Dietary
    Cohort Studies
    Confidence Intervals
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Female
    Follow-Up Studies
    Humans
    Hypertension
    Incidence
    Kidney Calculi
    Magnesium
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Odds Ratio
    Potassium, Dietary
    Prospective Studies
    Risk Factors
    Sodium, Dietary
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    United States

    Pub Type(s)

    Comparative Study
    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    9820450

    Citation

    Madore, F, et al. "Nephrolithiasis and Risk of Hypertension in Women." American Journal of Kidney Diseases : the Official Journal of the National Kidney Foundation, vol. 32, no. 5, 1998, pp. 802-7.
    Madore F, Stampfer MJ, Willett WC, et al. Nephrolithiasis and risk of hypertension in women. Am J Kidney Dis. 1998;32(5):802-7.
    Madore, F., Stampfer, M. J., Willett, W. C., Speizer, F. E., & Curhan, G. C. (1998). Nephrolithiasis and risk of hypertension in women. American Journal of Kidney Diseases : the Official Journal of the National Kidney Foundation, 32(5), pp. 802-7.
    Madore F, et al. Nephrolithiasis and Risk of Hypertension in Women. Am J Kidney Dis. 1998;32(5):802-7. PubMed PMID: 9820450.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Nephrolithiasis and risk of hypertension in women. AU - Madore,F, AU - Stampfer,M J, AU - Willett,W C, AU - Speizer,F E, AU - Curhan,G C, PY - 1998/11/20/pubmed PY - 1998/11/20/medline PY - 1998/11/20/entrez SP - 802 EP - 7 JF - American journal of kidney diseases : the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation JO - Am. J. Kidney Dis. VL - 32 IS - 5 N2 - Cross-sectional and prospective studies of men suggest a positive association between nephrolithiasis and hypertension. However, this association remains controversial in women. We conducted a prospective study of the relation between nephrolithiasis and the risk for hypertension in the Nurses' Health Study, a cohort of 89,376 women aged 34 to 59 years in 1980. Information on the history of nephrolithiasis, physician-diagnosed hypertension, and other relevant exposures was obtained by biennial mailed questionnaire. A history of nephrolithiasis before 1980 was reported by 2,558 women (2.9%), and a history of hypertension was reported by 11,883 women (13.3%). Among women without hypertension before 1980, 12,540 women reported a new diagnosis of hypertension between 1980 and 1992, during 711,039 person-years of follow-up. Compared with those without a history of nephrolithiasis, the age-adjusted relative risk (RR) for incident hypertension in women with such a history was 1.36 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20 to 1.43). After further adjustment for body mass index (BMI) and the intake of calcium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, caffeine, and alcohol, the RR was only slightly attenuated (RR=1.24; 95% CI, 1.13 to 1.37). In contrast, the occurrence of incident nephrolithiasis during follow-up was similar in women with hypertension at baseline compared with women without (adjusted odds ratio [OR]=1.01; 95% CI, 0.85 to 1.20). These data are consistent with the results obtained in men and support the hypothesis that a history of nephrolithiasis is associated with an increased risk for subsequent hypertension. Dietary factors, such as the intake of calcium, sodium, and potassium, do not explain this association. Unidentified pathogenic mechanisms common to nephrolithiasis and hypertension may be responsible for the development of both disorders. SN - 1523-6838 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9820450/Nephrolithiasis_and_risk_of_hypertension_in_women_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0272638698003199 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -