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Xenobiotic metabolism, oxidant stress and chronic pancreatitis. Focus on glutathione.
Digestion. 1998; 59 Suppl 4:13-24.D

Abstract

Chronic pancreatitis, although relatively rare in the Western World, is common in certain tropical zones where staple crops such as cassava are rich in cyanogenic glycosides. This paper reviews the evidence for a cyanide connection, with reference to experimental studies using another plant nitrile, crambene; and then examines the hypothesis that chronic pancreatitis represents a manifestation of uncoordinated detoxification reactions between pancreatic cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenases and phase II conjugating enzymes, resulting in the irreversible consumption of glutathione in the acinar cell. The conclusion is that the central role of disrupted pancreatic glutathione status, as a result of 'xenobiotic stress', in the evolution of chronic pancreatitis cannot be overestimated. This position contrasts with that in acute pancreatitis, in which glutathione depletion has a pivotal role too, but occurs as a result of 'stress' from reactive oxygen species.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Urbana, Ill., USA. m-wallig@uiuc.edu

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9832632

Citation

Wallig, M A.. "Xenobiotic Metabolism, Oxidant Stress and Chronic Pancreatitis. Focus On Glutathione." Digestion, vol. 59 Suppl 4, 1998, pp. 13-24.
Wallig MA. Xenobiotic metabolism, oxidant stress and chronic pancreatitis. Focus on glutathione. Digestion. 1998;59 Suppl 4:13-24.
Wallig, M. A. (1998). Xenobiotic metabolism, oxidant stress and chronic pancreatitis. Focus on glutathione. Digestion, 59 Suppl 4, 13-24.
Wallig MA. Xenobiotic Metabolism, Oxidant Stress and Chronic Pancreatitis. Focus On Glutathione. Digestion. 1998;59 Suppl 4:13-24. PubMed PMID: 9832632.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Xenobiotic metabolism, oxidant stress and chronic pancreatitis. Focus on glutathione. A1 - Wallig,M A, PY - 1998/12/2/pubmed PY - 2000/8/16/medline PY - 1998/12/2/entrez SP - 13 EP - 24 JF - Digestion JO - Digestion VL - 59 Suppl 4 N2 - Chronic pancreatitis, although relatively rare in the Western World, is common in certain tropical zones where staple crops such as cassava are rich in cyanogenic glycosides. This paper reviews the evidence for a cyanide connection, with reference to experimental studies using another plant nitrile, crambene; and then examines the hypothesis that chronic pancreatitis represents a manifestation of uncoordinated detoxification reactions between pancreatic cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenases and phase II conjugating enzymes, resulting in the irreversible consumption of glutathione in the acinar cell. The conclusion is that the central role of disrupted pancreatic glutathione status, as a result of 'xenobiotic stress', in the evolution of chronic pancreatitis cannot be overestimated. This position contrasts with that in acute pancreatitis, in which glutathione depletion has a pivotal role too, but occurs as a result of 'stress' from reactive oxygen species. SN - 0012-2823 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9832632/Xenobiotic_metabolism_oxidant_stress_and_chronic_pancreatitis__Focus_on_glutathione_ L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000051439 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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