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Hormonal and reproductive influences and risk of melanoma in women.
Int J Epidemiol. 1998 Oct; 27(5):751-7.IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Evidence linking female hormones to the development of malignant melanoma has been contradictory. The purpose of this study was to examine the risk of melanoma in relation to exogenous and endogenous hormonal variables in women, including oral contraceptives, replacement oestrogens, pregnancy, and menopause.

METHODS

Hormonal and reproductive factors were evaluated using data from a personal-interview population-based case-control study of melanoma in women conducted in Connecticut during 1987-1989. Caucasian female incident invasive melanoma cases (n = 308) were confirmed by standardized histopathological review. Caucasian female controls (n = 233) were selected by random digit dialling and frequency-matched on age. Data were analysed using multivariate logistic regression.

RESULTS

Ever being pregnant, age at first pregnancy, current use of replacement oestrogens, ever use of oral contraceptives, duration of use of oral contraceptives, and age at first use of oral contraceptives were not associated with melanoma. Among other variables, cases were more than twice as likely as controls to report a single pregnancy lasting >6 months, but this association lacked a dose-response relationship. Menopause and body mass index were not independently associated with risk of melanoma. However, this analysis did suggest that menopause and body mass index may be interactive risk factors. Melanoma cases were three times more likely than controls to be obese and report natural menopause when compared to thin/acceptable premenopausal women (OR = 3.00, 95% CI: 1.03-8.73).

CONCLUSIONS

These data do not provide strong evidence that hormonal and reproductive factors are associated with risk of melanoma in women, although the few positive results should be explored further.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Management and Policy, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 55455-0381, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9839729

Citation

Smith, M A., et al. "Hormonal and Reproductive Influences and Risk of Melanoma in Women." International Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 27, no. 5, 1998, pp. 751-7.
Smith MA, Fine JA, Barnhill RL, et al. Hormonal and reproductive influences and risk of melanoma in women. Int J Epidemiol. 1998;27(5):751-7.
Smith, M. A., Fine, J. A., Barnhill, R. L., & Berwick, M. (1998). Hormonal and reproductive influences and risk of melanoma in women. International Journal of Epidemiology, 27(5), 751-7.
Smith MA, et al. Hormonal and Reproductive Influences and Risk of Melanoma in Women. Int J Epidemiol. 1998;27(5):751-7. PubMed PMID: 9839729.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hormonal and reproductive influences and risk of melanoma in women. AU - Smith,M A, AU - Fine,J A, AU - Barnhill,R L, AU - Berwick,M, PY - 1998/12/5/pubmed PY - 1998/12/5/medline PY - 1998/12/5/entrez KW - Americas KW - Biology KW - Body Weight--women KW - Case Control Studies KW - Connecticut KW - Contraception KW - Contraceptive Methods KW - Demographic Factors KW - Dermatological Effects--women KW - Developed Countries KW - Diseases KW - Family Planning KW - Fertility KW - Fertility Measurements KW - Menopause KW - Neoplasms--women KW - North America KW - Northern America KW - Oral Contraceptives KW - Parity KW - Physiology KW - Population KW - Population Dynamics KW - Pregnancy KW - Reproduction KW - Research Methodology KW - Research Report KW - Risk Factors KW - Studies KW - United States SP - 751 EP - 7 JF - International journal of epidemiology JO - Int J Epidemiol VL - 27 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Evidence linking female hormones to the development of malignant melanoma has been contradictory. The purpose of this study was to examine the risk of melanoma in relation to exogenous and endogenous hormonal variables in women, including oral contraceptives, replacement oestrogens, pregnancy, and menopause. METHODS: Hormonal and reproductive factors were evaluated using data from a personal-interview population-based case-control study of melanoma in women conducted in Connecticut during 1987-1989. Caucasian female incident invasive melanoma cases (n = 308) were confirmed by standardized histopathological review. Caucasian female controls (n = 233) were selected by random digit dialling and frequency-matched on age. Data were analysed using multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS: Ever being pregnant, age at first pregnancy, current use of replacement oestrogens, ever use of oral contraceptives, duration of use of oral contraceptives, and age at first use of oral contraceptives were not associated with melanoma. Among other variables, cases were more than twice as likely as controls to report a single pregnancy lasting >6 months, but this association lacked a dose-response relationship. Menopause and body mass index were not independently associated with risk of melanoma. However, this analysis did suggest that menopause and body mass index may be interactive risk factors. Melanoma cases were three times more likely than controls to be obese and report natural menopause when compared to thin/acceptable premenopausal women (OR = 3.00, 95% CI: 1.03-8.73). CONCLUSIONS: These data do not provide strong evidence that hormonal and reproductive factors are associated with risk of melanoma in women, although the few positive results should be explored further. SN - 0300-5771 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9839729/Hormonal_and_reproductive_influences_and_risk_of_melanoma_in_women_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ije/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ije/27.5.751 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -