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Absence of vitamin D deficiency in young Nigerian children.
J Pediatr 1998; 133(6):740-4JPed

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in young Nigerian children residing in an area where nutritional rickets is common.

STUDY DESIGN

A randomized cluster sample of children aged 6 to 35 months in Jos, Nigeria.

RESULTS

Of 218 children evaluated, no child in the study had a 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) concentration <10 ng/mL (the generally held definition of vitamin D deficiency). Children spent an average of 8.3 hours per day outside of the home. Twenty children (9.2%) had clinical findings of rickets. Children with clinical signs of rickets were more likely to be not currently breast fed and have significantly lower serum calcium concentrations than those without signs of rickets (9.1 vs 9.4 mg/dL, respectively, P =.01). Yet, 25-OHD levels were not significantly different between those children with clinical signs of rickets and those without such clinical signs.

CONCLUSION

Vitamin D deficiency was not found in this population of young children in whom clinical rickets is common. This is consistent with the hypothesis that dietary calcium insufficiency, without preexisting vitamin D deficiency, accounts for the development of clinical rickets in Nigerian children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9842036

Citation

Pfitzner, M A., et al. "Absence of Vitamin D Deficiency in Young Nigerian Children." The Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 133, no. 6, 1998, pp. 740-4.
Pfitzner MA, Thacher TD, Pettifor JM, et al. Absence of vitamin D deficiency in young Nigerian children. J Pediatr. 1998;133(6):740-4.
Pfitzner, M. A., Thacher, T. D., Pettifor, J. M., Zoakah, A. I., Lawson, J. O., Isichei, C. O., & Fischer, P. R. (1998). Absence of vitamin D deficiency in young Nigerian children. The Journal of Pediatrics, 133(6), pp. 740-4.
Pfitzner MA, et al. Absence of Vitamin D Deficiency in Young Nigerian Children. J Pediatr. 1998;133(6):740-4. PubMed PMID: 9842036.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Absence of vitamin D deficiency in young Nigerian children. AU - Pfitzner,M A, AU - Thacher,T D, AU - Pettifor,J M, AU - Zoakah,A I, AU - Lawson,J O, AU - Isichei,C O, AU - Fischer,P R, PY - 1998/12/8/pubmed PY - 1998/12/8/medline PY - 1998/12/8/entrez KW - Africa KW - Africa South Of The Sahara KW - Age Factors KW - Biology KW - Calcium KW - Child KW - Deficiency Diseases KW - Demographic Factors KW - Developing Countries KW - Diseases KW - English Speaking Africa KW - Metals KW - Micronutrients KW - Nigeria KW - Nutrition Disorders KW - Physiology KW - Population KW - Population Characteristics KW - Research Report KW - Vitamins KW - Western Africa KW - Youth SP - 740 EP - 4 JF - The Journal of pediatrics JO - J. Pediatr. VL - 133 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in young Nigerian children residing in an area where nutritional rickets is common. STUDY DESIGN: A randomized cluster sample of children aged 6 to 35 months in Jos, Nigeria. RESULTS: Of 218 children evaluated, no child in the study had a 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) concentration <10 ng/mL (the generally held definition of vitamin D deficiency). Children spent an average of 8.3 hours per day outside of the home. Twenty children (9.2%) had clinical findings of rickets. Children with clinical signs of rickets were more likely to be not currently breast fed and have significantly lower serum calcium concentrations than those without signs of rickets (9.1 vs 9.4 mg/dL, respectively, P =.01). Yet, 25-OHD levels were not significantly different between those children with clinical signs of rickets and those without such clinical signs. CONCLUSION: Vitamin D deficiency was not found in this population of young children in whom clinical rickets is common. This is consistent with the hypothesis that dietary calcium insufficiency, without preexisting vitamin D deficiency, accounts for the development of clinical rickets in Nigerian children. SN - 0022-3476 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9842036/Absence_of_vitamin_D_deficiency_in_young_Nigerian_children_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-3476(98)70143-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -