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Demographic and psychosocial predictors of fruit and vegetable intakes differ: implications for dietary interventions.
J Am Diet Assoc 1998; 98(12):1412-7JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The National Cancer Institute (Rockville, Md) has launched a nationwide initiative--5 A Day for Better Health--to encourage consumption of fruits and vegetables. Because the tastes and culinary uses of fruits and vegetables differ, however, it is not known whether a general 5-A-Day message is an effective intervention strategy. This study examined whether there are differences between the demographic and psychosocial correlates of fruit and vegetable intakes.

DESIGN

Data are from the Washington State Cancer Risk Behavior Survey (1995-1996), a cross-sectional, random-digit-dial telephone survey representative of the adult population of Washington State.

SUBJECTS/SETTING

Interviews were completed with 1,450 adults. Data were collected about demographic characteristics, health status, health-related behavior, fruit and vegetable intakes, and the following diet-related psychosocial factors: beliefs, motives, barriers, attitudes, and stages of dietary change.

STATISTICAL ANALYSES

Multivariate linear regression analysis was used to test whether the associations of demographic characteristics and psychosocial factors with fruit intake differed from associations with vegetable intake.

RESULTS

In general, health status, health-related behavior, and psychosocial factors were more strongly associated with fruit intakes than vegetable intakes. For example, regular exercisers consumed 0.44 more daily servings of fruits and 0.36 more servings of vegetables than nonexercisers. Compared with those in the preaction stage of dietary change, adults in the maintenance stage consumed 0.99 more daily servings of fruits and 0.68 more servings of vegetables. Intrinsic motivations for eating a healthful diet (eg, to feel better) were strongly associated with both fruit and vegetable intakes, and these associations were stronger for fruit. Extrinsic motivations were not associated with either fruit or vegetable intakes.

APPLICATIONS

Dietary interventions based on a general 5-A-Day message may be more effective in increasing fruit intakes than vegetable intakes. Targeted interventions that focus specifically on vegetables are probably necessary. Intrinsic motives for eating a healthful diet should be key components of interventions to increase fruit and vegetable intakes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cancer Prevention Research Program, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Wash 98109-1024, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9850109

Citation

Trudeau, E, et al. "Demographic and Psychosocial Predictors of Fruit and Vegetable Intakes Differ: Implications for Dietary Interventions." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 98, no. 12, 1998, pp. 1412-7.
Trudeau E, Kristal AR, Li S, et al. Demographic and psychosocial predictors of fruit and vegetable intakes differ: implications for dietary interventions. J Am Diet Assoc. 1998;98(12):1412-7.
Trudeau, E., Kristal, A. R., Li, S., & Patterson, R. E. (1998). Demographic and psychosocial predictors of fruit and vegetable intakes differ: implications for dietary interventions. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 98(12), pp. 1412-7.
Trudeau E, et al. Demographic and Psychosocial Predictors of Fruit and Vegetable Intakes Differ: Implications for Dietary Interventions. J Am Diet Assoc. 1998;98(12):1412-7. PubMed PMID: 9850109.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Demographic and psychosocial predictors of fruit and vegetable intakes differ: implications for dietary interventions. AU - Trudeau,E, AU - Kristal,A R, AU - Li,S, AU - Patterson,R E, PY - 1998/12/16/pubmed PY - 1998/12/16/medline PY - 1998/12/16/entrez SP - 1412 EP - 7 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 98 IS - 12 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The National Cancer Institute (Rockville, Md) has launched a nationwide initiative--5 A Day for Better Health--to encourage consumption of fruits and vegetables. Because the tastes and culinary uses of fruits and vegetables differ, however, it is not known whether a general 5-A-Day message is an effective intervention strategy. This study examined whether there are differences between the demographic and psychosocial correlates of fruit and vegetable intakes. DESIGN: Data are from the Washington State Cancer Risk Behavior Survey (1995-1996), a cross-sectional, random-digit-dial telephone survey representative of the adult population of Washington State. SUBJECTS/SETTING: Interviews were completed with 1,450 adults. Data were collected about demographic characteristics, health status, health-related behavior, fruit and vegetable intakes, and the following diet-related psychosocial factors: beliefs, motives, barriers, attitudes, and stages of dietary change. STATISTICAL ANALYSES: Multivariate linear regression analysis was used to test whether the associations of demographic characteristics and psychosocial factors with fruit intake differed from associations with vegetable intake. RESULTS: In general, health status, health-related behavior, and psychosocial factors were more strongly associated with fruit intakes than vegetable intakes. For example, regular exercisers consumed 0.44 more daily servings of fruits and 0.36 more servings of vegetables than nonexercisers. Compared with those in the preaction stage of dietary change, adults in the maintenance stage consumed 0.99 more daily servings of fruits and 0.68 more servings of vegetables. Intrinsic motivations for eating a healthful diet (eg, to feel better) were strongly associated with both fruit and vegetable intakes, and these associations were stronger for fruit. Extrinsic motivations were not associated with either fruit or vegetable intakes. APPLICATIONS: Dietary interventions based on a general 5-A-Day message may be more effective in increasing fruit intakes than vegetable intakes. Targeted interventions that focus specifically on vegetables are probably necessary. Intrinsic motives for eating a healthful diet should be key components of interventions to increase fruit and vegetable intakes. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9850109/Demographic_and_psychosocial_predictors_of_fruit_and_vegetable_intakes_differ:_implications_for_dietary_interventions_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(98)00319-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -