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Oral sedation.
Compend Contin Educ Dent. 1998 Sep; 19(9):868-70, 872, 874 passim.CC

Abstract

"I fear a trip to the dentist more than I fear death" is the response one person gave in a national survey recently cited in USA Today. While clearly representing an extreme, the results of many surveys suggest that fear of dentistry is still prevalent and is a measure of the failure of current therapeutic approaches to reduce pain and anxiety sufficiently to enable people, especially those with special needs, to visit the dentist. Patients who are fearful would likely seek oral health care more regularly if anesthesia and sedation were more readily available. Taking into consideration that the safety of anxiolytic drugs is highly dependent on the drug, dose, and route of administration used, oral premedication should be the sedative technique used by most dentists because it is efficacious, requires little monitoring when appropriate doses are used, and is unlikely to result in serious morbidity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Clinical Pharmacology Unit, National Institute of Dental Research, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9852800

Citation

Dionne, R. "Oral Sedation." Compendium of Continuing Education in Dentistry (Jamesburg, N.J. : 1995), vol. 19, no. 9, 1998, 868-70, 872, 874 passim.
Dionne R. Oral sedation. Compend Contin Educ Dent. 1998;19(9):868-70, 872, 874 passim.
Dionne, R. (1998). Oral sedation. Compendium of Continuing Education in Dentistry (Jamesburg, N.J. : 1995), 19(9), 868-70, 872, 874 passim.
Dionne R. Oral Sedation. Compend Contin Educ Dent. 1998;19(9):868-70, 872, 874 passim. PubMed PMID: 9852800.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Oral sedation. A1 - Dionne,R, PY - 1998/12/16/pubmed PY - 1998/12/16/medline PY - 1998/12/16/entrez SP - 868-70, 872, 874 passim JF - Compendium of continuing education in dentistry (Jamesburg, N.J. : 1995) JO - Compend Contin Educ Dent VL - 19 IS - 9 N2 - "I fear a trip to the dentist more than I fear death" is the response one person gave in a national survey recently cited in USA Today. While clearly representing an extreme, the results of many surveys suggest that fear of dentistry is still prevalent and is a measure of the failure of current therapeutic approaches to reduce pain and anxiety sufficiently to enable people, especially those with special needs, to visit the dentist. Patients who are fearful would likely seek oral health care more regularly if anesthesia and sedation were more readily available. Taking into consideration that the safety of anxiolytic drugs is highly dependent on the drug, dose, and route of administration used, oral premedication should be the sedative technique used by most dentists because it is efficacious, requires little monitoring when appropriate doses are used, and is unlikely to result in serious morbidity. SN - 1548-8578 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9852800/Oral_sedation_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -