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[A 61-year-old man with progressive gait disturbance, freezing, and vertical gaze paresis who developed esophagus cancer].
No To Shinkei. 1998 Nov; 50(11):1041-52.NT

Abstract

We report a 61-year-old Japanese man who died of complications of esophagus cancer surgery. He was well until his 55 years of the age, when he had an onset of speech disturbance and hand writing. He was seen by a neurologist who prescribed Menesit 600 mg/day. His symptoms improved with this medication. In 1993, three years after the onset, he started to show gait disturbance and easy to fall. In 1995, he noted difficulty in eye opening. He visited our clinic on October 26, 1996. On examination, he showed vertical gaze paresis, masked face, nuchal rigidity, small step gait, freezing phenomena, and festination. His mental status was normal. He was treated with 800 mg/day of Menesit, 800 mg/day of L-dops, and 10 mg/day of bromocriptine with little improvement in his symptoms. Cranial CT scan revealed some dilatation of the third ventricle. Subsequent clinical course was one of the slow progression of his parkinsonism. In September of 1997, he noted difficulty in swallowing. He was admitted to the gastrointestinal service of our hospital on October 14, 1997. On admission, neurologic status was essentially similar to the previous one, but he showed more advanced state of his parkinsonism. Upper gastrointestinal series revealed a mass lesion of about 11.5 cm in length protruding into the lower esophagus lumen. Subtotal esophagus resection including the mass was performed on December 2, 1997. The stomach was elevated for anastomosis with the upper esophagus. No metastases were found in the mediastinum except for two lymph nodes in the para-esophageal region. The subsequent course was complicated by marked elevation of GOT, GPT, LDH, total bilirubin as well as direct bilirubin, alkaliphosphatase, and amylase starting in the evening of the surgery. On December 7, leukocytosis and pneumonic shadow were seen involving his right lung. On December 10, he developed cardiopulmonary arrest. He was once resuscitated; however, he developed cardiac arrest again seven hours later and pronounced dead. He was discussed in a neurologic CPC. The chief discussant arrived at the conclusion that the patient had PSP and the cause of the death was ascribed to circulatory disturbance to the liver. The discussant also thought that the terminal course was complicated by cholangitis or cholecystitis, sepsis, and pulmonary embolism. Surgical specimen of the esophagus tumor revealed carcinosarcoma. Postmortem examination revealed yellowish discoloration of the peritoneum and mesenterium, and accumulation of clouded ascites indicating the presence of peritonitis. Inflammatory change extended to the mediastinum. On microscopic examination, various kinds of bacilli and candida spores were seen. The liver was enlarged and a perforation was noted in the gallbladder causing biliary necrosis in the adjacent liver. An extensive infarct was seen in the left lobe of the liver; this was found to be due to obstruction of the hepatic artery at the site of the duodenohepatic mesenterium and obstruction of intrahepatic portal vein secondary to retrograde intrahepatic cholangitis in the left lobe. A piece of surgical threads was seen adjacent to the hepatic artery; foreign body granulomatous reaction was seen surrounding the surgical thread. The rupture of the gallbladder appeared to be due to the obstruction of the left branch of the hepatic artery. Neuropathologic examination revealed extensive degeneration of the pallidum, the substantia nigra, and the subthalamic nucleus and presence of neurofibrillary tangles in the remaining neurons. The neuropathologic findings were consistent with progressive supranuclear palsy, although the pathologic changes in the midbrain tegmentum was only mild gliosis.

Authors

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Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Clinical Conference
English Abstract
Journal Article

Language

jpn

PubMed ID

9866133

Citation

Miyashita, N, et al. "[A 61-year-old Man With Progressive Gait Disturbance, Freezing, and Vertical Gaze Paresis Who Developed Esophagus Cancer]." No to Shinkei = Brain and Nerve, vol. 50, no. 11, 1998, pp. 1041-52.
Miyashita N, Kondo T, Wakiya M, et al. [A 61-year-old man with progressive gait disturbance, freezing, and vertical gaze paresis who developed esophagus cancer]. No To Shinkei. 1998;50(11):1041-52.
Miyashita, N., Kondo, T., Wakiya, M., Mori, H., Shirai, T., Takubo, H., & Mizuno, Y. (1998). [A 61-year-old man with progressive gait disturbance, freezing, and vertical gaze paresis who developed esophagus cancer]. No to Shinkei = Brain and Nerve, 50(11), 1041-52.
Miyashita N, et al. [A 61-year-old Man With Progressive Gait Disturbance, Freezing, and Vertical Gaze Paresis Who Developed Esophagus Cancer]. No To Shinkei. 1998;50(11):1041-52. PubMed PMID: 9866133.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [A 61-year-old man with progressive gait disturbance, freezing, and vertical gaze paresis who developed esophagus cancer]. AU - Miyashita,N, AU - Kondo,T, AU - Wakiya,M, AU - Mori,H, AU - Shirai,T, AU - Takubo,H, AU - Mizuno,Y, PY - 1998/12/29/pubmed PY - 1998/12/29/medline PY - 1998/12/29/entrez SP - 1041 EP - 52 JF - No to shinkei = Brain and nerve JO - No To Shinkei VL - 50 IS - 11 N2 - We report a 61-year-old Japanese man who died of complications of esophagus cancer surgery. He was well until his 55 years of the age, when he had an onset of speech disturbance and hand writing. He was seen by a neurologist who prescribed Menesit 600 mg/day. His symptoms improved with this medication. In 1993, three years after the onset, he started to show gait disturbance and easy to fall. In 1995, he noted difficulty in eye opening. He visited our clinic on October 26, 1996. On examination, he showed vertical gaze paresis, masked face, nuchal rigidity, small step gait, freezing phenomena, and festination. His mental status was normal. He was treated with 800 mg/day of Menesit, 800 mg/day of L-dops, and 10 mg/day of bromocriptine with little improvement in his symptoms. Cranial CT scan revealed some dilatation of the third ventricle. Subsequent clinical course was one of the slow progression of his parkinsonism. In September of 1997, he noted difficulty in swallowing. He was admitted to the gastrointestinal service of our hospital on October 14, 1997. On admission, neurologic status was essentially similar to the previous one, but he showed more advanced state of his parkinsonism. Upper gastrointestinal series revealed a mass lesion of about 11.5 cm in length protruding into the lower esophagus lumen. Subtotal esophagus resection including the mass was performed on December 2, 1997. The stomach was elevated for anastomosis with the upper esophagus. No metastases were found in the mediastinum except for two lymph nodes in the para-esophageal region. The subsequent course was complicated by marked elevation of GOT, GPT, LDH, total bilirubin as well as direct bilirubin, alkaliphosphatase, and amylase starting in the evening of the surgery. On December 7, leukocytosis and pneumonic shadow were seen involving his right lung. On December 10, he developed cardiopulmonary arrest. He was once resuscitated; however, he developed cardiac arrest again seven hours later and pronounced dead. He was discussed in a neurologic CPC. The chief discussant arrived at the conclusion that the patient had PSP and the cause of the death was ascribed to circulatory disturbance to the liver. The discussant also thought that the terminal course was complicated by cholangitis or cholecystitis, sepsis, and pulmonary embolism. Surgical specimen of the esophagus tumor revealed carcinosarcoma. Postmortem examination revealed yellowish discoloration of the peritoneum and mesenterium, and accumulation of clouded ascites indicating the presence of peritonitis. Inflammatory change extended to the mediastinum. On microscopic examination, various kinds of bacilli and candida spores were seen. The liver was enlarged and a perforation was noted in the gallbladder causing biliary necrosis in the adjacent liver. An extensive infarct was seen in the left lobe of the liver; this was found to be due to obstruction of the hepatic artery at the site of the duodenohepatic mesenterium and obstruction of intrahepatic portal vein secondary to retrograde intrahepatic cholangitis in the left lobe. A piece of surgical threads was seen adjacent to the hepatic artery; foreign body granulomatous reaction was seen surrounding the surgical thread. The rupture of the gallbladder appeared to be due to the obstruction of the left branch of the hepatic artery. Neuropathologic examination revealed extensive degeneration of the pallidum, the substantia nigra, and the subthalamic nucleus and presence of neurofibrillary tangles in the remaining neurons. The neuropathologic findings were consistent with progressive supranuclear palsy, although the pathologic changes in the midbrain tegmentum was only mild gliosis. SN - 0006-8969 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9866133/[A_61_year_old_man_with_progressive_gait_disturbance_freezing_and_vertical_gaze_paresis_who_developed_esophagus_cancer]_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/esophagealcancer.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -