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Individual differences in the biphasic effects of ethanol.
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1998 Dec; 22(9):1903-11.AC

Abstract

Ethanol exerts both stimulant-like and sedative-like subjective and behavioral effects in humans depending on the dose, the time after ingestion and, we will argue, also on the individual taking the drug. This study assessed stimulant-like and sedative-like subjective and behavioral effects of ethanol during the ascending and descending limbs of the blood alcohol curve across a range of doses in nonproblem social drinkers. Forty-nine healthy men and women, 21 to 35 years old, consumed a beverage containing placebo or ethanol (0.2, 0.4, or 0.8 g/kg) on four separate laboratory sessions, in randomized order and under double-blind conditions. Subjective and behavioral responses were assessed before and at regular intervals for 3 hr after ingestion of the beverage. The lowest dose of ethanol (0.2 g/kg) only produced negligible subjective effects compared to placebo. The moderate dose (0.4 g/kg) increased sedative-like effects 90 min after ethanol ingestion but did not increase ratings of stimulant effects at any time. The highest dose (0.8 g/kg) increased ratings of both stimulant- and sedative-like effects during the ascending limb and produced only sedative-like effects during the descending limb. Closer examination of the data revealed that individual differences in response to the highest dose of ethanol accounted for this unexpected pattern of results: about half of the subjects reported stimulant-like effects on the ascending limb and sedative-like effects on the descending limb after 0.8 g/kg ethanol, whereas the other half did not report stimulant-like effects at any time after administration of ethanol. These results challenge the simple assumption that ethanol has biphasic subjective effects across both dose and time, and extend previous findings demonstrating individual differences in response to ethanol.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, The University of Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9884132

Citation

Holdstock, L, and H de Wit. "Individual Differences in the Biphasic Effects of Ethanol." Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 22, no. 9, 1998, pp. 1903-11.
Holdstock L, de Wit H. Individual differences in the biphasic effects of ethanol. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1998;22(9):1903-11.
Holdstock, L., & de Wit, H. (1998). Individual differences in the biphasic effects of ethanol. Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, 22(9), 1903-11.
Holdstock L, de Wit H. Individual Differences in the Biphasic Effects of Ethanol. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1998;22(9):1903-11. PubMed PMID: 9884132.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Individual differences in the biphasic effects of ethanol. AU - Holdstock,L, AU - de Wit,H, PY - 1999/1/12/pubmed PY - 1999/1/12/medline PY - 1999/1/12/entrez SP - 1903 EP - 11 JF - Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research JO - Alcohol. Clin. Exp. Res. VL - 22 IS - 9 N2 - Ethanol exerts both stimulant-like and sedative-like subjective and behavioral effects in humans depending on the dose, the time after ingestion and, we will argue, also on the individual taking the drug. This study assessed stimulant-like and sedative-like subjective and behavioral effects of ethanol during the ascending and descending limbs of the blood alcohol curve across a range of doses in nonproblem social drinkers. Forty-nine healthy men and women, 21 to 35 years old, consumed a beverage containing placebo or ethanol (0.2, 0.4, or 0.8 g/kg) on four separate laboratory sessions, in randomized order and under double-blind conditions. Subjective and behavioral responses were assessed before and at regular intervals for 3 hr after ingestion of the beverage. The lowest dose of ethanol (0.2 g/kg) only produced negligible subjective effects compared to placebo. The moderate dose (0.4 g/kg) increased sedative-like effects 90 min after ethanol ingestion but did not increase ratings of stimulant effects at any time. The highest dose (0.8 g/kg) increased ratings of both stimulant- and sedative-like effects during the ascending limb and produced only sedative-like effects during the descending limb. Closer examination of the data revealed that individual differences in response to the highest dose of ethanol accounted for this unexpected pattern of results: about half of the subjects reported stimulant-like effects on the ascending limb and sedative-like effects on the descending limb after 0.8 g/kg ethanol, whereas the other half did not report stimulant-like effects at any time after administration of ethanol. These results challenge the simple assumption that ethanol has biphasic subjective effects across both dose and time, and extend previous findings demonstrating individual differences in response to ethanol. SN - 0145-6008 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9884132/Individual_differences_in_the_biphasic_effects_of_ethanol_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0145-6008&date=1998&volume=22&issue=9&spage=1903 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -