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Positive association between resting pulse and cancer incidence in current and former smokers.
Ann Epidemiol 1999; 9(1):34-44AE

Abstract

PURPOSE

To evaluate the association between resting pulse and cancer incidence in older persons.

METHODS

A cohort of 2819 persons, aged 65 to 102 years at baseline, was followed for the development of cancer from 1982 through 1993 by linkage to a statewide cancer registry; 494 incident cases were identified. Resting radial pulse (beats per minute) was measured during an in-person interview at baseline, and sex-specific quintile cutpoints were used in the analysis.

RESULTS

After adjustment for age, body mass, smoking, and physical activity, there was a positive association between pulse and cancer incidence in men: compared to men with a pulse of < 63, men with a pulse of 63-68 (relative risk (RR); 95% confidence interval (CI): RR = 1.68; CI = 1.06-2.66), 69-74 (RR = 1.54; CI = 0.95-2.49), 75-82 (RR = 1.62; CI = 1.03-2.55), and > 82 (RR = 1.63; CI = 1.03-2.65) were at elevated risk for any cancer. This association remained unchanged after further adjustment for cardiovascular comorbidity, diabetes, alcohol use, high level of depressive symptoms, and low self-perceived health status. Exclusion of cases diagnosed in the first two years of follow-up did not alter the association. There was no overall association between pulse and cancer incidence in women. Analyses stratified by smoking status showed that the pulse and cancer association was strongest in ever smokers for both men and women. In subsite analysis for men, pulse was mainly associated with smoking-related tumors as a group and colorectal and prostate cancer.

CONCLUSIONS

These data suggest that resting pulse is associated with cancer incidence, mainly among ever smokers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Preventive Medicine and Environmental Health, The University of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City 52242-1008, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9915607

Citation

Cerhan, J R., et al. "Positive Association Between Resting Pulse and Cancer Incidence in Current and Former Smokers." Annals of Epidemiology, vol. 9, no. 1, 1999, pp. 34-44.
Cerhan JR, Pavuk M, Wallace RB. Positive association between resting pulse and cancer incidence in current and former smokers. Ann Epidemiol. 1999;9(1):34-44.
Cerhan, J. R., Pavuk, M., & Wallace, R. B. (1999). Positive association between resting pulse and cancer incidence in current and former smokers. Annals of Epidemiology, 9(1), pp. 34-44.
Cerhan JR, Pavuk M, Wallace RB. Positive Association Between Resting Pulse and Cancer Incidence in Current and Former Smokers. Ann Epidemiol. 1999;9(1):34-44. PubMed PMID: 9915607.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Positive association between resting pulse and cancer incidence in current and former smokers. AU - Cerhan,J R, AU - Pavuk,M, AU - Wallace,R B, PY - 1999/1/23/pubmed PY - 1999/1/23/medline PY - 1999/1/23/entrez SP - 34 EP - 44 JF - Annals of epidemiology JO - Ann Epidemiol VL - 9 IS - 1 N2 - PURPOSE: To evaluate the association between resting pulse and cancer incidence in older persons. METHODS: A cohort of 2819 persons, aged 65 to 102 years at baseline, was followed for the development of cancer from 1982 through 1993 by linkage to a statewide cancer registry; 494 incident cases were identified. Resting radial pulse (beats per minute) was measured during an in-person interview at baseline, and sex-specific quintile cutpoints were used in the analysis. RESULTS: After adjustment for age, body mass, smoking, and physical activity, there was a positive association between pulse and cancer incidence in men: compared to men with a pulse of < 63, men with a pulse of 63-68 (relative risk (RR); 95% confidence interval (CI): RR = 1.68; CI = 1.06-2.66), 69-74 (RR = 1.54; CI = 0.95-2.49), 75-82 (RR = 1.62; CI = 1.03-2.55), and > 82 (RR = 1.63; CI = 1.03-2.65) were at elevated risk for any cancer. This association remained unchanged after further adjustment for cardiovascular comorbidity, diabetes, alcohol use, high level of depressive symptoms, and low self-perceived health status. Exclusion of cases diagnosed in the first two years of follow-up did not alter the association. There was no overall association between pulse and cancer incidence in women. Analyses stratified by smoking status showed that the pulse and cancer association was strongest in ever smokers for both men and women. In subsite analysis for men, pulse was mainly associated with smoking-related tumors as a group and colorectal and prostate cancer. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that resting pulse is associated with cancer incidence, mainly among ever smokers. SN - 1047-2797 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9915607/Positive_association_between_resting_pulse_and_cancer_incidence_in_current_and_former_smokers_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1047279798000325 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -