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Hepatitis C: Part I. Routine serologic testing and diagnosis.
Am Fam Physician 1999; 59(1):79-88, 91-2AF

Abstract

Hepatitis C, which is caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV), is a major public health problem in the United States. HCV is most efficiently transmitted through large or repeated percutaneous exposures to blood. Most patients with acute HCV infection develop persistent infection, and 70 percent of patients develop chronic hepatitis. HCV-associated chronic liver disease results in 8,000 to 10,000 deaths per year, and the annual costs of acute and chronic hepatitis C exceed $600 million. An estimated 3.9 million Americans are currently infected with HCV, but most of these persons are asymptomatic and do not know they are infected. To identify them, primary health care professionals should obtain a history of high-risk practices associated with the transmission of HCV and other bloodborne pathogens from all patients. Routine testing is currently recommended only in patients who are most likely to be infected with HCV.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9917576

Citation

Moyer, L A., et al. "Hepatitis C: Part I. Routine Serologic Testing and Diagnosis." American Family Physician, vol. 59, no. 1, 1999, pp. 79-88, 91-2.
Moyer LA, Mast EE, Alter MJ. Hepatitis C: Part I. Routine serologic testing and diagnosis. Am Fam Physician. 1999;59(1):79-88, 91-2.
Moyer, L. A., Mast, E. E., & Alter, M. J. (1999). Hepatitis C: Part I. Routine serologic testing and diagnosis. American Family Physician, 59(1), pp. 79-88, 91-2.
Moyer LA, Mast EE, Alter MJ. Hepatitis C: Part I. Routine Serologic Testing and Diagnosis. Am Fam Physician. 1999 Jan 1;59(1):79-88, 91-2. PubMed PMID: 9917576.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hepatitis C: Part I. Routine serologic testing and diagnosis. AU - Moyer,L A, AU - Mast,E E, AU - Alter,M J, PY - 1999/1/26/pubmed PY - 1999/1/26/medline PY - 1999/1/26/entrez SP - 79-88, 91-2 JF - American family physician JO - Am Fam Physician VL - 59 IS - 1 N2 - Hepatitis C, which is caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV), is a major public health problem in the United States. HCV is most efficiently transmitted through large or repeated percutaneous exposures to blood. Most patients with acute HCV infection develop persistent infection, and 70 percent of patients develop chronic hepatitis. HCV-associated chronic liver disease results in 8,000 to 10,000 deaths per year, and the annual costs of acute and chronic hepatitis C exceed $600 million. An estimated 3.9 million Americans are currently infected with HCV, but most of these persons are asymptomatic and do not know they are infected. To identify them, primary health care professionals should obtain a history of high-risk practices associated with the transmission of HCV and other bloodborne pathogens from all patients. Routine testing is currently recommended only in patients who are most likely to be infected with HCV. SN - 0002-838X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9917576/Hepatitis_C:_Part_I__Routine_serologic_testing_and_diagnosis_ L2 - http://www.aafp.org/link_out?pmid=9917576 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -