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Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections after scleral buckling procedures for retinal detachments associated with atopic dermatitis.
Ophthalmology. 1999 Jan; 106(1):142-7.O

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the incidence and the clinical course of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus as a cause of acute-onset infections in patients with atopic dermatitis after a scleral buckling procedures.

DESIGN

A retrospective chart review.

PARTICIPANTS

Two hundred eighty-seven patients (293 eyes) who underwent scleral buckling procedures to treat rhegmatogenous retinal detachments at either Osaka Rosai Hospital or Osaka University Medical School between July 1, 1995, and June 30, 1997, participated. Of these, 32 eyes (10.9%) were associated with atopic dermatitis.

INTERVENTION

Demographic and clinical data were abstracted from patients' medical records.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

The incidence, clinical features, and management of postoperative infections associated with methicillin-resistant S. aureus were studied.

RESULTS

Methicillin-resistant S. aureus infection after scleral buckling procedures was identified in 6 (18.8%) of 32 eyes of patients with atopic dermatitis but in only 1 (0.4%) of the other 261 cases without atopic dermatitis (P < 0.001). The average interval from the scleral buckling procedures to the initial onset of infection was 8.3 +/- 9.1 days (range, 2-28 days). Bacterial infection and inflammation were controlled in four eyes by prompt removal of the infected buckle in combination with vancomycin administration. In the other three eyes, however, repeat intravitreous injections of vancomycin or emergent vitrectomies were required because of the development of endophthalmitis.

CONCLUSIONS

Methicillin-resistant S. aureus is an important causative pathogen of scleral buckling infections, particularly in patients with retinal detachment associated with atopic dermatitis. Preoperative evaluation and intraoperative attention to contamination are recommended to prevent methicillin-resistant S. aureus infections in these patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Ophthalmology, Osaka Rosai Hospital, Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9917795

Citation

Oshima, Y, et al. "Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infections After Scleral Buckling Procedures for Retinal Detachments Associated With Atopic Dermatitis." Ophthalmology, vol. 106, no. 1, 1999, pp. 142-7.
Oshima Y, Ohji M, Inoue Y, et al. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections after scleral buckling procedures for retinal detachments associated with atopic dermatitis. Ophthalmology. 1999;106(1):142-7.
Oshima, Y., Ohji, M., Inoue, Y., Harada, J., Motokura, M., Saito, Y., Emi, K., & Tano, Y. (1999). Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections after scleral buckling procedures for retinal detachments associated with atopic dermatitis. Ophthalmology, 106(1), 142-7.
Oshima Y, et al. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infections After Scleral Buckling Procedures for Retinal Detachments Associated With Atopic Dermatitis. Ophthalmology. 1999;106(1):142-7. PubMed PMID: 9917795.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections after scleral buckling procedures for retinal detachments associated with atopic dermatitis. AU - Oshima,Y, AU - Ohji,M, AU - Inoue,Y, AU - Harada,J, AU - Motokura,M, AU - Saito,Y, AU - Emi,K, AU - Tano,Y, PY - 1999/1/26/pubmed PY - 1999/1/26/medline PY - 1999/1/26/entrez SP - 142 EP - 7 JF - Ophthalmology JO - Ophthalmology VL - 106 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence and the clinical course of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus as a cause of acute-onset infections in patients with atopic dermatitis after a scleral buckling procedures. DESIGN: A retrospective chart review. PARTICIPANTS: Two hundred eighty-seven patients (293 eyes) who underwent scleral buckling procedures to treat rhegmatogenous retinal detachments at either Osaka Rosai Hospital or Osaka University Medical School between July 1, 1995, and June 30, 1997, participated. Of these, 32 eyes (10.9%) were associated with atopic dermatitis. INTERVENTION: Demographic and clinical data were abstracted from patients' medical records. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The incidence, clinical features, and management of postoperative infections associated with methicillin-resistant S. aureus were studied. RESULTS: Methicillin-resistant S. aureus infection after scleral buckling procedures was identified in 6 (18.8%) of 32 eyes of patients with atopic dermatitis but in only 1 (0.4%) of the other 261 cases without atopic dermatitis (P < 0.001). The average interval from the scleral buckling procedures to the initial onset of infection was 8.3 +/- 9.1 days (range, 2-28 days). Bacterial infection and inflammation were controlled in four eyes by prompt removal of the infected buckle in combination with vancomycin administration. In the other three eyes, however, repeat intravitreous injections of vancomycin or emergent vitrectomies were required because of the development of endophthalmitis. CONCLUSIONS: Methicillin-resistant S. aureus is an important causative pathogen of scleral buckling infections, particularly in patients with retinal detachment associated with atopic dermatitis. Preoperative evaluation and intraoperative attention to contamination are recommended to prevent methicillin-resistant S. aureus infections in these patients. SN - 0161-6420 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9917795/Methicillin_resistant_Staphylococcus_aureus_infections_after_scleral_buckling_procedures_for_retinal_detachments_associated_with_atopic_dermatitis_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0161-6420(99)90025-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -