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The misrepresented uterus. The progression of uterine depictions in anatomical atlases between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries.
J Biocommun. 1998; 25(4):10-3.JB

Abstract

Between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries, the depiction of the female uterus progressed toward greater anatomical accuracy. However, as Karen Newman (1996) indicates, common elements persist throughout such illustrations: the fetus is represented as an active inhabitant of the uterus while the female body is rendered as either passive or absent.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Toronto.

Pub Type(s)

Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9924689

Citation

Petruccelli, K. "The Misrepresented Uterus. the Progression of Uterine Depictions in Anatomical Atlases Between the Sixteenth and Eighteenth Centuries." The Journal of Biocommunication, vol. 25, no. 4, 1998, pp. 10-3.
Petruccelli K. The misrepresented uterus. The progression of uterine depictions in anatomical atlases between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries. J Biocommun. 1998;25(4):10-3.
Petruccelli, K. (1998). The misrepresented uterus. The progression of uterine depictions in anatomical atlases between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries. The Journal of Biocommunication, 25(4), 10-3.
Petruccelli K. The Misrepresented Uterus. the Progression of Uterine Depictions in Anatomical Atlases Between the Sixteenth and Eighteenth Centuries. J Biocommun. 1998;25(4):10-3. PubMed PMID: 9924689.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The misrepresented uterus. The progression of uterine depictions in anatomical atlases between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries. A1 - Petruccelli,K, PY - 1999/1/30/pubmed PY - 1999/1/30/medline PY - 1999/1/30/entrez SP - 10 EP - 3 JF - The Journal of biocommunication JO - J Biocommun VL - 25 IS - 4 N2 - Between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries, the depiction of the female uterus progressed toward greater anatomical accuracy. However, as Karen Newman (1996) indicates, common elements persist throughout such illustrations: the fetus is represented as an active inhabitant of the uterus while the female body is rendered as either passive or absent. SN - 0094-2499 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9924689/The_misrepresented_uterus__The_progression_of_uterine_depictions_in_anatomical_atlases_between_the_sixteenth_and_eighteenth_centuries_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -