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Youth ice hockey tournament injuries: rates and patterns compared to season play.
Med Sci Sports Exerc 1999; 31(1):46-51MS

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To prospectively document the incidence of game injury rates in youth ice hockey tournaments to compare with season-long game injury rates and to analyze the injuries occurring at tournaments by mechanism, type, body location, severity, player position, and period of play.

DESIGN

A prospective injury report form completed for injured players by the tournament athletic trainer.

SETTING

Four boys' tournaments and one girls' tournament during the 1993-94 season.

PARTICIPANTS

807 boys and girls, ages 9-19.

MEASUREMENTS/MAIN RESULTS

60 injuries occurred in boys and 4 occurred in girls. There were 26 boys with significant injuries and no girls with significant injuries. The significant game injury rates per 1000 player hours were 50.9 for boys combined, 57.9 for boys' Peewee A, 42.7 for boys' Bantam A, 64.8 for boys' varsity high school, 44.8 for boys' Junior Gold, and 0 for girls' Peewee A and B. Cerebral concussion comprised 15% of boys' injuries.

CONCLUSIONS

The significant injury rate for boys' tournament game play was 4-6 times higher than the season game injury rates in two previous season-long studies. In boys' games, 65% of "all" injuries and 77% of "significant" injuries were related to collisions. The girls' rules of play do not allow body checking, and there were no significant injuries in girls' games. The boys had high rates of cerebral concussion injury at all age levels. Minimizing the frequency and intensity of collisions in the boys' game may decrease the injury rates, especially in the tournament setting.

Authors+Show Affiliations

MinnHealth SportsCare, White Bear Lake, MN 55110, USA. rober037@maroon.tc.umn.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9927009

Citation

Roberts, W O., et al. "Youth Ice Hockey Tournament Injuries: Rates and Patterns Compared to Season Play." Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 31, no. 1, 1999, pp. 46-51.
Roberts WO, Brust JD, Leonard B. Youth ice hockey tournament injuries: rates and patterns compared to season play. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1999;31(1):46-51.
Roberts, W. O., Brust, J. D., & Leonard, B. (1999). Youth ice hockey tournament injuries: rates and patterns compared to season play. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 31(1), pp. 46-51.
Roberts WO, Brust JD, Leonard B. Youth Ice Hockey Tournament Injuries: Rates and Patterns Compared to Season Play. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1999;31(1):46-51. PubMed PMID: 9927009.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Youth ice hockey tournament injuries: rates and patterns compared to season play. AU - Roberts,W O, AU - Brust,J D, AU - Leonard,B, PY - 1999/2/2/pubmed PY - 1999/2/2/medline PY - 1999/2/2/entrez SP - 46 EP - 51 JF - Medicine and science in sports and exercise JO - Med Sci Sports Exerc VL - 31 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To prospectively document the incidence of game injury rates in youth ice hockey tournaments to compare with season-long game injury rates and to analyze the injuries occurring at tournaments by mechanism, type, body location, severity, player position, and period of play. DESIGN: A prospective injury report form completed for injured players by the tournament athletic trainer. SETTING: Four boys' tournaments and one girls' tournament during the 1993-94 season. PARTICIPANTS: 807 boys and girls, ages 9-19. MEASUREMENTS/MAIN RESULTS: 60 injuries occurred in boys and 4 occurred in girls. There were 26 boys with significant injuries and no girls with significant injuries. The significant game injury rates per 1000 player hours were 50.9 for boys combined, 57.9 for boys' Peewee A, 42.7 for boys' Bantam A, 64.8 for boys' varsity high school, 44.8 for boys' Junior Gold, and 0 for girls' Peewee A and B. Cerebral concussion comprised 15% of boys' injuries. CONCLUSIONS: The significant injury rate for boys' tournament game play was 4-6 times higher than the season game injury rates in two previous season-long studies. In boys' games, 65% of "all" injuries and 77% of "significant" injuries were related to collisions. The girls' rules of play do not allow body checking, and there were no significant injuries in girls' games. The boys had high rates of cerebral concussion injury at all age levels. Minimizing the frequency and intensity of collisions in the boys' game may decrease the injury rates, especially in the tournament setting. SN - 0195-9131 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9927009/Youth_ice_hockey_tournament_injuries:_rates_and_patterns_compared_to_season_play_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=9927009 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -