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Biochemical markers of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid intake during pregnancy.
Clin Exp Obstet Gynecol 1998; 25(4):135-8CE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

To assess the relationship between the mothers' intake of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC PUFA) during pregnancy and their levels in plasma and tissue.

METHODS

162 mothers were studied during labor. Three groups were differentiated according to the n3 LC PUFA intake assessed by means of a dietetic interview: superior intake (SIG) (> 0.721 g/day), medium intake (MIG) (from 0.382 to 0.721 g/day) and inferior intake (IIG) (< 0.381 g/day). Fatty acids (FA) were studied by capillary chromatography in plasma and in erythrocyte phospholipids.

RESULTS

The fatty acids (FA), expressed in absolute values, did not show any significant differences among the aforementioned groups. However, three were some trends which were confirmed when the FA were expressed in percentages. Thus, higher levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) were found in SIG both in plasma and in the erythrocyte membrane, when expressed in percentages. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) was also higher in the SIG in the erythrocyte membrane, whereas in plasma the differences were of marginal significance. On the other hand, arachidonic and linoleic acids had lower values in the SIG in erythrocytes. The theoretical optimal intake of n-3 LC PUFA corresponded to a plasma concentration of 117.9 +/- 45.9 mcg/ml n-3 LC PUFA or 2.54% of the total fatty content (2.29% of DHA). The corresponding cut-offs in erythrocyte membranes were 7.54% of total lipids (5.59% of DHA).

CONCLUSION

The best markers of n-3 LC PUFA intake were DHA for plasma and DHA and EPA for erythrocyte phospholipids, all of them expressed in proportions of total FA. The arachidonic and linoleic acids (in percentages) in erythrocyte phospholipids were also good markers of n-3 intake. This probably reflects the metabolic competition between both PUFA families.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hospital from Cruces Pais Vasco University, Baracaldo, Vizcaya, Spain.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9987571

Citation

Matorras, R, et al. "Biochemical Markers of N-3 Long Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Intake During Pregnancy." Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, vol. 25, no. 4, 1998, pp. 135-8.
Matorras R, Perteagudo L, Sanjurjo P. Biochemical markers of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid intake during pregnancy. Clin Exp Obstet Gynecol. 1998;25(4):135-8.
Matorras, R., Perteagudo, L., & Sanjurjo, P. (1998). Biochemical markers of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid intake during pregnancy. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 25(4), pp. 135-8.
Matorras R, Perteagudo L, Sanjurjo P. Biochemical Markers of N-3 Long Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Intake During Pregnancy. Clin Exp Obstet Gynecol. 1998;25(4):135-8. PubMed PMID: 9987571.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Biochemical markers of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid intake during pregnancy. AU - Matorras,R, AU - Perteagudo,L, AU - Sanjurjo,P, PY - 1999/2/13/pubmed PY - 1999/2/13/medline PY - 1999/2/13/entrez SP - 135 EP - 8 JF - Clinical and experimental obstetrics & gynecology JO - Clin Exp Obstet Gynecol VL - 25 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: To assess the relationship between the mothers' intake of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC PUFA) during pregnancy and their levels in plasma and tissue. METHODS: 162 mothers were studied during labor. Three groups were differentiated according to the n3 LC PUFA intake assessed by means of a dietetic interview: superior intake (SIG) (> 0.721 g/day), medium intake (MIG) (from 0.382 to 0.721 g/day) and inferior intake (IIG) (< 0.381 g/day). Fatty acids (FA) were studied by capillary chromatography in plasma and in erythrocyte phospholipids. RESULTS: The fatty acids (FA), expressed in absolute values, did not show any significant differences among the aforementioned groups. However, three were some trends which were confirmed when the FA were expressed in percentages. Thus, higher levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) were found in SIG both in plasma and in the erythrocyte membrane, when expressed in percentages. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) was also higher in the SIG in the erythrocyte membrane, whereas in plasma the differences were of marginal significance. On the other hand, arachidonic and linoleic acids had lower values in the SIG in erythrocytes. The theoretical optimal intake of n-3 LC PUFA corresponded to a plasma concentration of 117.9 +/- 45.9 mcg/ml n-3 LC PUFA or 2.54% of the total fatty content (2.29% of DHA). The corresponding cut-offs in erythrocyte membranes were 7.54% of total lipids (5.59% of DHA). CONCLUSION: The best markers of n-3 LC PUFA intake were DHA for plasma and DHA and EPA for erythrocyte phospholipids, all of them expressed in proportions of total FA. The arachidonic and linoleic acids (in percentages) in erythrocyte phospholipids were also good markers of n-3 intake. This probably reflects the metabolic competition between both PUFA families. SN - 0390-6663 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9987571/Biochemical_markers_of_n_3_long_chain_polyunsaturated_fatty_acid_intake_during_pregnancy_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/5922 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -