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Dietary antioxidants and risk of myocardial infarction in the elderly: the Rotterdam Study.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Epidemiologic studies have shown dietary antioxidants to be inversely correlated with ischemic heart disease.

OBJECTIVE

We investigated whether dietary beta-carotene, vitamin C, and vitamin E were related to the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) in an elderly population.

DESIGN

The study sample consisted of 4802 participants of the Rotterdam Study aged 55-95 y who were free of MI at baseline and for whom dietary data assessed by a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire were available. During a 4-y follow-up period, 124 subjects had an MI. The association between energy-adjusted beta-carotene, vitamin C, and vitamin E intakes and risk of MI was examined by multivariate logistic regression.

RESULTS

Risk of MI for the highest compared with the lowest tertile of beta-carotene intake was 0.55 (95% CI: 0.34, 0.83; P for trend = 0.013), adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, pack-years, income, education, alcohol intake, energy-adjusted intakes of vitamin C and E, and use of antioxidative vitamin supplements. When beta-carotene intakes from supplements were considered, the inverse relation with risk of MI was slightly more pronounced. Stratification by smoking status indicated that the association was most evident in current and former smokers. No association with risk of MI was observed for dietary vitamin C and vitamin E.

CONCLUSION

The results of this observational study in the elderly population of the Rotterdam Study support the hypothesis that high dietary beta-carotene intakes may protect against cardiovascular disease. We did not observe an association between vitamin C or vitamin E and MI.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Erasmus University Medical School, Rotterdam, Netherlands.

    , , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Antioxidants
    Ascorbic Acid
    Diet
    Female
    Humans
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Myocardial Infarction
    Prospective Studies
    Regression Analysis
    Risk Factors
    Smoking
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Vitamin E
    beta Carotene

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    9989690

    Citation

    Klipstein-Grobusch, K, et al. "Dietary Antioxidants and Risk of Myocardial Infarction in the Elderly: the Rotterdam Study." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 69, no. 2, 1999, pp. 261-6.
    Klipstein-Grobusch K, Geleijnse JM, den Breeijen JH, et al. Dietary antioxidants and risk of myocardial infarction in the elderly: the Rotterdam Study. Am J Clin Nutr. 1999;69(2):261-6.
    Klipstein-Grobusch, K., Geleijnse, J. M., den Breeijen, J. H., Boeing, H., Hofman, A., Grobbee, D. E., & Witteman, J. C. (1999). Dietary antioxidants and risk of myocardial infarction in the elderly: the Rotterdam Study. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 69(2), pp. 261-6.
    Klipstein-Grobusch K, et al. Dietary Antioxidants and Risk of Myocardial Infarction in the Elderly: the Rotterdam Study. Am J Clin Nutr. 1999;69(2):261-6. PubMed PMID: 9989690.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary antioxidants and risk of myocardial infarction in the elderly: the Rotterdam Study. AU - Klipstein-Grobusch,K, AU - Geleijnse,J M, AU - den Breeijen,J H, AU - Boeing,H, AU - Hofman,A, AU - Grobbee,D E, AU - Witteman,J C, PY - 1999/2/16/pubmed PY - 1999/2/16/medline PY - 1999/2/16/entrez SP - 261 EP - 6 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 69 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic studies have shown dietary antioxidants to be inversely correlated with ischemic heart disease. OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether dietary beta-carotene, vitamin C, and vitamin E were related to the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) in an elderly population. DESIGN: The study sample consisted of 4802 participants of the Rotterdam Study aged 55-95 y who were free of MI at baseline and for whom dietary data assessed by a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire were available. During a 4-y follow-up period, 124 subjects had an MI. The association between energy-adjusted beta-carotene, vitamin C, and vitamin E intakes and risk of MI was examined by multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS: Risk of MI for the highest compared with the lowest tertile of beta-carotene intake was 0.55 (95% CI: 0.34, 0.83; P for trend = 0.013), adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, pack-years, income, education, alcohol intake, energy-adjusted intakes of vitamin C and E, and use of antioxidative vitamin supplements. When beta-carotene intakes from supplements were considered, the inverse relation with risk of MI was slightly more pronounced. Stratification by smoking status indicated that the association was most evident in current and former smokers. No association with risk of MI was observed for dietary vitamin C and vitamin E. CONCLUSION: The results of this observational study in the elderly population of the Rotterdam Study support the hypothesis that high dietary beta-carotene intakes may protect against cardiovascular disease. We did not observe an association between vitamin C or vitamin E and MI. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9989690/Dietary_antioxidants_and_risk_of_myocardial_infarction_in_the_elderly:_the_Rotterdam_Study_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/69.2.261 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -