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383 results
  • In Silico Drug Repurposing in Multiple Sclerosis Using scRNA-Seq Data. [Journal Article]
    Int J Mol Sci. 2023 Jan 04; 24(2)Shevtsov A, Raevskiy M, … Medvedeva Y
  • Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system still lacking a cure. Treatment typically focuses on slowing the progression and managing MS symptoms. Single-cell transcriptomics allows the investigation of the immune system-the key player in MS onset and development-in great detail increasing our understanding of MS mechanisms and stimulating the discovery of the t…
  • Supercritical CO2 Extraction of Organic Solvents from Flunisolide and Fluticasone Propionate. [Journal Article]
    Pharmaceutics. 2021 Apr 23; 13(5)Baldino L, Scognamiglio M, Reverchon E
  • In this work, Class 2 and Class 3 solvents contained in two corticosteroids, flunisolide (Fluni) and fluticasone propionate (Fluti), were reduced to a few ppm by supercritical CO2 extraction. The process was carried out at pressures from 80 to 200 bar, temperatures of 40 °C and 80 °C, and at a fixed CO2 flow rate of 0.7 kg/h. The results demonstrated that CO2 density is the key parameter influenc…
  • Drugs and Lactation Database (LactMed): Flunisolide [BOOK]
    Drugs and Lactation Database (LactMed). National Library of Medicine (US): Bethesda (MD)BOOK
  • Although not measured, the amounts of inhaled corticosteroids absorbed into the maternal bloodstream and excreted into breastmilk are probably too small to affect a breastfed infant. Reviewers and an expert panel consider inhaled and oral corticosteroids acceptable to use during breastfeeding.[1][2][3]
  • The vagal ganglia transcriptome identifies candidate therapeutics for airway hyperreactivity. [Journal Article]
    Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol. 2018 08 01; 315(2):L133-L148.Reznikov LR, Meyerholz DK, … Welsh MJ
  • Mainstay therapeutics are ineffective in some people with asthma, suggesting a need for additional agents. In the current study, we used vagal ganglia transcriptome profiling and connectivity mapping to identify compounds beneficial for alleviating airway hyperreactivity (AHR). As a comparison, we also used previously published transcriptome data from sensitized mouse lungs and human asthmatic en…
  • Inhaled corticosteroids: Effects on growth and bone health. [Review]
    Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2016 12; 117(6):595-600.Skoner DP
  • CONCLUSIONS: Because of the systemic effects on growth and bone health, children should be monitored for growth using stadiometry every 3 to 6 months and BMD should be monitored yearly in patients being treated with high doses of ICSs.
  • Dilemmas, Confusion, and Misconceptions Related to Small Airways Directed Therapy. [Review]
    Chest. 2017 06; 151(6):1345-1355.Lavorini F, Pedersen S, … Aerosol Drug Management Improvement Team (ADMIT)
  • During the past decade, there has been increasing evidence that the small airways (ie, airways < 2 mm in internal diameter) contribute substantially to the pathophysiologic and clinical expression of asthma and COPD. The increased interest in small airways is, at least in part, a result of innovation in small-particle aerosol formulations that better target the distal lung and also advanced physi…
  • Intranasal steroids versus placebo or no intervention for chronic rhinosinusitis. [Review]
    Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2016 Apr 26; 4:CD011996.Chong LY, Head K, … Burton MJ
  • CONCLUSIONS: Most of the evidence available was from studies in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps. There is little information about quality of life (very low quality evidence). For disease severity, there seems to be improvement for all symptoms (low quality evidence), a moderate-sized benefit for nasal blockage and a small benefit for rhinorrhoea (moderate quality evidence). The risk of epistaxis is increased (high quality evidence), but these data included all levels of severity; small streaks of blood may not be a major concern for patients. It is unclear whether there is a difference in the risk of local irritation (low quality evidence).
  • Different types of intranasal steroids for chronic rhinosinusitis. [Review]
    Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2016 Apr 26; 4:CD011993.Chong LY, Head K, … Schilder AG
  • CONCLUSIONS: We found insufficient evidence to suggest that one type of intranasal steroid is more effective than another in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis, nor that the effectiveness of a spray differs from an aerosol. We identified no studies that compared drops with spray.It is unclear if higher doses result in better symptom improvements (low quality evidence), but there was moderate quality evidence of an increased risk of epistaxis as an adverse effect of treatment when higher doses were used. This included all levels of severity of epistaxis and it is likely that the proportion of events that required patients to discontinue usage is low due to the low numbers of withdrawals attributed to it. If epistaxis is limited to streaks of blood in the mucus it may be tolerated by the patient and it may be safe to continue treatment. However, it may be a factor that affects compliance.There is insufficient evidence to suggest that the different types of corticosteroid molecule or spray versus aerosol have different effects. Lower doses have similar effectiveness but fewer side effects.Clearly more research in this area is needed, with specific attention given to trial design, disease-specific health-related quality of life outcomes and evaluation of longer-term outcomes and adverse effects.
  • Stopping long-acting beta2-agonists (LABA) for children with asthma well controlled on LABA and inhaled corticosteroids. [Review]
    Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015 May 21Kew KM, Beggs S, Ahmad S
  • CONCLUSIONS: There is currently no evidence from randomised trials to inform the discontinuation of LABAs in children once asthma control is achieved with ICS plus LABA. It is disappointing that such an important issue has not been studied, and a randomised double-blind trial recruiting children who are controlled on ICS plus LABA is warranted. The study should be large enough to assess children of different ages, and to measure the important safety and efficacy outcomes suggested in this review over at least six months.The only randomised evidence for stopping LABA has been conducted in adults; it will be summarised in a separate review.
  • Flunisolide hydrofluoroalkane with integrated spacer for treating asthma: an updated review. [Review]
    Allergy Asthma Proc. 2015 Mar-Apr; 36(2):105-15.Berger WE, Tashkin DP
  • Flunisolide hydrofluoroalkane (HFA) with integrated spacer is the most recent reformulated inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) for asthma available in the United States. It is the only product that combines a corticosteroid extrafine aerosol with a built-in spacer. The potential clinical benefit of the flunisolide HFA formulation and its integrated spacer for treating persistent asthma was assessed thro…
  • Inhaled corticosteroids in children with persistent asthma: effects on growth. [Journal Article]
    Evid Based Child Health. 2014 Dec; 9(4):829-930.Zhang L, Prietsch SO, Ducharme FM
  • CONCLUSIONS: Regular use of ICS at low or medium daily doses is associated with a mean reduction of 0.48 cm/y in linear growth velocity and a 0.61-cm change from baseline in height during a one-year treatment period in children with mild to moderate persistent asthma. The effect size of ICS on linear growth velocity appears to be associated more strongly with the ICS molecule than with the device or dose (low to medium dose range). ICS-induced growth suppression seems to be maximal during the first year of therapy and less pronounced in subsequent years of treatment. However, additional studies are needed to better characterise the molecule dependency of growth suppression, particularly with newer molecules (mometasone, ciclesonide), to specify the respective role of molecule, daily dose, inhalation device and patient age on the effect size of ICS, and to define the growth suppression effect of ICS treatment over a period of several years in children with persistent asthma.
  • Inhaled corticosteroids in children with persistent asthma: effects on growth. [Review]
    Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2014 Jul 17Zhang L, Prietsch SO, Ducharme FM
  • CONCLUSIONS: Regular use of ICS at low or medium daily doses is associated with a mean reduction of 0.48 cm/y in linear growth velocity and a 0.61-cm change from baseline in height during a one-year treatment period in children with mild to moderate persistent asthma. The effect size of ICS on linear growth velocity appears to be associated more strongly with the ICS molecule than with the device or dose (low to medium dose range). ICS-induced growth suppression seems to be maximal during the first year of therapy and less pronounced in subsequent years of treatment. However, additional studies are needed to better characterise the molecule dependency of growth suppression, particularly with newer molecules (mometasone, ciclesonide), to specify the respective role of molecule, daily dose, inhalation device and patient age on the effect size of ICS, and to define the growth suppression effect of ICS treatment over a period of several years in children with persistent asthma.
  • Flunisolide for the treatment of asthma. [Review]
    Expert Rev Clin Pharmacol. 2014 May; 7(3):251-8.Melani AS
  • Inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) are recommended for treatment of persistent asthma. Several ICSs are available and delivered by a variety of devices. After the banning of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC), a formulation of hydrofluoroalkane (HFA)-flunisolide marketed with an in-built spacer has been developed, complying with the request of efficacy and safety for children and adults. It delivers an aerosol…
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