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(Cirrhosis)
323,462 results
  • Psychosocial interventions to reduce alcohol consumption in concurrent problem alcohol and illicit drug users. [Review]
  • CDCochrane Database Syst Rev 2018 Dec 05; 12:CD009269
  • Klimas J, Fairgrieve C, … Cullen W
  • CONCLUSIONS: We found low to very low-quality evidence to suggest that there is no difference in effectiveness between different types of psychosocial interventions to reduce alcohol consumption among people who use illicit drugs, and that brief interventions are not superior to assessment-only or to treatment as usual. No firm conclusions can be made because of the paucity of the data and the low quality of the retrieved studies.
  • Vaccines for preventing invasive salmonella infections in people with sickle cell disease. [Review]
  • CDCochrane Database Syst Rev 2018 Dec 05; 12:CD006975
  • Odey F, Okomo U, Oyo-Ita A
  • CONCLUSIONS: It is expected that salmonella vaccines may be useful in people with sickle cell disease, especially in resource-poor settings where the majority of those who suffer from the condition are found. Unfortunately, there are no randomized controlled trials on the efficacy and safety of the different types of salmonella vaccines in people with sickle cell disease. We conclude that there is a need for a well-designed, adequately-powered, randomized controlled trial to assess the benefits and risks of the different types of salmonella vaccines as a means of improving survival and decreasing mortality from salmonella infections in people with sickle cell disease. However, we believe that there are unlikely to be any trials published in this area, therefore, this review will no longer be regularly updated.
  • Pharmacological interventions for acute hepatitis C infection. [Review]
  • CDCochrane Database Syst Rev 2018 Dec 03; 12:CD011644
  • Kalafateli M, Buzzetti E, … Gurusamy KS
  • CONCLUSIONS: Very low quality evidence suggests that interferon-alpha may decrease the incidence of chronic HCV infection as measured by sustained virological response. However, the clinical impact such as improvement in health-related quality of life, reduction in cirrhosis, decompensated liver disease, and liver transplantation has not been reported. It is also not clear whether this finding is applicable in the current clinical setting dominated by the use of pegylated interferons and direct-acting antivirals, although we found no evidence to support that pegylated interferons or ribavirin or both are effective in people with acute HCV infection. We could find no randomised trials comparing direct-acting antivirals with placebo or other interventions for acute HCV infection. There is significant uncertainty in the benefits and harms of the interventions, and high-quality randomised clinical trials are required.
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