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471,687 results
  • The effects of metabolic syndrome, obesity, and the gut microbiome on load-induced osteoarthritis. [Journal Article]
  • OCOsteoarthritis Cartilage 2018 Sep 18
  • Guss JD, Ziemian SN, … Hernandez CJ
  • CONCLUSIONS: Severe obesity increased load-induced cartilage damage, while milder changes in adiposity/metabolic syndrome seen in TLR5KO mice did not. Furthermore, the effects of systemic inflammation/obesity on cartilage damage depend on the duration of mechanical loading. Lastly, reduced cartilage damage in the TLR5KOΔMicrobiota mice suggests that the gut microbiome may influence cartilage pathology.
  • Takotsubo cardiomyopathy triggered by influenza B. [Journal Article]
  • PMPol Merkur Lekarski 2018 Aug 29; 45(266):67-70
  • Elikowski W, Małek-Elikowska M, … Mozer-Lisewska I
  • Influenza is associated with a high prevalence of cardiac complications, including myocarditis and exacerbation of ischemic heart disease or heart failure (HF). However, only four cases of stress-ind...
  • Effects of physical exercise during pregnancy on maternal and infant outcomes in overweight and obese pregnant women: A meta-analysis. [Review]
  • BBirth 2018 Sep 21
  • Du MC, Ouyang YQ, … Redding SR
  • CONCLUSIONS: Prenatal exercise interventions reduced gestational weight gain and the risk of gestational diabetes for overweight and obese pregnant women, which reinforced the benefits of exercise during pregnancy. However, no evidence was found with respect to benefits and/or harm for infants. Consideration should be taken when interpreting these findings as a result of the relative small sample size in this meta-analysis. Further larger well-designed randomized trials may be helpful to assess the short-term and long-term effects of prenatal exercise on maternal and infant outcomes.
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