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(Xerese Topical Cream)
6 results
  • Drugs and Lactation Database (LactMed): Hydrocortisone, Topical [BOOK]
    National Library of Medicine (US): Bethesda (MD)BOOK
  • Topical hydrocortisone has not been studied during breastfeeding. Since only extensive application of the most potent corticosteroids may cause systemic effects in the mother, it is unlikely that short-term application of topical hydrocortisone would pose a risk to the breastfed infant by passage into breastmilk. However, it would be prudent to use the least potent drug on the smallest area of sk…
  • Drugs and Lactation Database (LactMed): Acyclovir [BOOK]
    National Library of Medicine (US): Bethesda (MD)BOOK
  • Even with the highest maternal dosages, the dosage of acyclovir in milk is only about 1% of a typical infant dosage and would not be expected to cause any adverse effects in breastfed infants. Topical acyclovir applied to small areas of the mother's body away from the breast should pose no risk to the infant. Only water-miscible cream or gel products should be applied to the breast because ointme…
  • Drugs and Lactation Database (LactMed): Hydrocortisone [BOOK]
    National Library of Medicine (US): Bethesda (MD)BOOK
  • Hydrocortisone (cortisol) is a normal component of breastmilk that passes from the mother's bloodstream into milk and might have a role in intestinal maturation, the intestinal microbiome, growth, body composition or neurodevelopment, but adequate studies are lacking.[1] Concentrations follow a diurnal rhythm, with the highest concentrations in the morning at about 7:00 am and the lowest concentr…
  • Herpes Labialis: An Update. [Review]
    Recent Pat Inflamm Allergy Drug Discov 2017; 11(2):107-113Leung AKC, Barankin B
  • CONCLUSIONS: For episodic treatment, oral antiviral agents, such as acyclovir (Zovirax), valacyclovir (Valtrex) and famciclovir (Famvir), are superior to topical antiviral therapy. Valacyclovir and famciclovir have greater oral bioavailability and are better absorbed than acyclovir, require less frequent dosing, but are more expensive and are not approved for children. Topical antiviral agents such as 5% acyclovir cream/ointment (Zovirax) ± hydrocortisone (Xerese), 1% penciclovir (Denavir) cream, and 50 mg Buccal Adhesive Tablet (ABT-50 mg) can also be used for episodic treatment of herpes labialis. These topical agents are not effective in the prevention of recurrent herpes labialis. For chronic daily suppressive therapy, oral antivirals are the treatment of choice.
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