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(didanosine)
2,806 results
  • Mitochondrial DNA Haplogroups and Frailty in Adults Living with HIV. [Journal Article]
    AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses 2020Erlandson KM, Bradford Y, … Hulgan T
  • Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroup has been associated with disease risk and longevity. Among persons with HIV (PWH), mtDNA haplogroup has been associated with AIDS progression, neuropathy, cognitive impairment, and gait speed decline. We sought to determine whether haplogroup is associated with frailty and its components among older PWH. A cross-sectional analysis was performed of AIDS Clinica…
  • Drug-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Adults: An Update. [Journal Article]
    Pancreas 2019 Nov/Dec; 48(10):1263-1273Simons-Linares CR, Elkhouly MA, Salazar MJ
  • Drug-induced acute pancreatitis (DIAP) is a rare entity that is often challenging for clinicians. The aim of our study was to provide updated DIAP classes considering the updated definition of acute pancreatitis (AP) and in light of new medications and new case reports. A MEDLINE search (1950-2018) of the English language literature was performed looking for all adult (≥17 years old) human case r…
  • Depletion of Mitochondrial DNA in Differentiated Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells. [Journal Article]
    Sci Rep 2019; 9(1):15355Hu X, Calton MA, … Vollrath D
  • We investigated the effects of treating differentiated retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells with didanosine (ddI), which is associated with retinopathy in individuals with HIV/AIDS. We hypothesized that such treatment would cause depletion of mitochondrial DNA and provide insight into the consequences of degradation of RPE mitochondrial function in aging and disease. Treatment of differentiated…
  • LiverTox: Clinical and Research Information on Drug-Induced Liver Injury: Nucleoside Analogues [BOOK]
    National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: Bethesda (MD)BOOK
  • The nucleoside analogues are an important class of antiviral agents now commonly used in the therapy of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, hepatitis B virus (HBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection. The nucleoside analogues resemble naturally occurring nucleosides and act by causing termination of the nascent DNA chain. These agents are generally safe and w…
  • LiverTox: Clinical and Research Information on Drug-Induced Liver Injury: Antiviral Agents [BOOK]
    National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: Bethesda (MD)BOOK
  • The antivirals are a large and diverse group of agents that are typically classified by the virus infections for which they are used, their chemical structure and their mode of action. Most antiviral agents have been developed in the last 20 to 25 years, many as a result of the major research efforts to develop therapies and means of prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and …
  • LiverTox: Clinical and Research Information on Drug-Induced Liver Injury: Didanosine [BOOK]
    National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: Bethesda (MD)BOOK
  • Didanosine is a purine nucleoside analogue and reverse transcriptase inhibitor that was previously widely used in combination with other agents in the therapy of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and the acquired immunodeficiency syndromes (AIDS). Didanosine therapy is associated with an appreciable rate of serum enzyme elevations during therapy, and it is a well established cause of c…
  • Disclosure of human immunodeficiency virus status to children in South Africa: A comprehensive analysis. [Journal Article]
    South Afr J HIV Med 2019; 20(1):884van Elsland SL, Peters RPH, … van Furth AM
  • CONCLUSIONS: When children do well on treatment, caregivers feel less stringent need to disclose. Well-functioning families, higher educated caregivers and better socio-economic status enabled and promoted disclosure. Non-disclosure can indicate a sub-optimal social structure which could negatively affect adherence and viral suppression. There is an urgent need to address disclosure thoughtfully and proactively in the long-term disease management. For the disclosure process to be beneficial, an enabling supportive context is important, which will provide a great opportunity for future interventions.
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