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(hematocrit)
52,256 results
  • Arterial and venous thrombosis by high platelet count and high hematocrit: 108,521 individuals from the Copenhagen General Population Study. [Journal Article]
  • JTJ Thromb Haemost 2019 Jul 15
  • Warny M, Helby J, … Nordestgaard BG
  • CONCLUSIONS: Multivariable adjusted hazard ratios for individuals with platelet counts in the top 5 percentiles (>398 x 109 /L) versus in the 25th -75th percentiles (231-316x 109 /L) were 1.77 (95% CI: 1.38-2.24) for arterial thrombosis in the brain (38 and 26 events/10,000 person-years) and 0.82 (0.61-1.11) for arterial thrombosis in the heart (23 and 28 events/10,000 person-years). For individuals with hematocrit values in the top 5 percentiles (women/men: > 45 / > 48%) versus the 25th -75th percentiles (women/men: 38.1-42 / 41.1-45%), hazard ratios were 1.27 (0.91-1.75) for arterial thrombosis in the brain (40 and 26 events/10,000 person-years) and 1.46 (1.06-2.00) for arterial thrombosis in the heart (43 and 25 events/10,000 person-years). Neither high platelet count nor high hematocrit was associated with risk of venous thromboembolism. When excluding individuals with myeloproliferative neoplasia from the main analyses, results on risk of thrombosis were similar. In this prospective study, high platelet counts were associated with 1.8-fold risk of arterial thrombosis in the brain while high hematocrit was associated with 1.5-fold risk of arterial thrombosis in the heart. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
  • Comparison of Intraosseous, Arterial, and Venous Blood Sampling for Laboratory Analysis in Hemorrhagic Shock. [Journal Article]
  • CLClin Lab 2019 Jul 01; 65(7)
  • Strandberg G, Larsson A, … Eriksson M
  • CONCLUSIONS: Average levels of blood gases, acid base parameters, hematocrit, CK, AST, γ-GT, creatinine, and ALT, but not lactate and glucose, were similar in IO and venous samples in hypovolemia. However, precision was limited, indicating that IO test results should be confirmed when other vascular access is established, and that analysis of IO samples should be limited to acute situations and not used for detailed diagnostics in this setting.
  • The Utility of MRI for Measuring Hematocrit in Fetal Anemia. [Journal Article]
  • AJAm J Obstet Gynecol 2019 Jul 12
  • Xu J, Duan AQ, … Seed M
  • CONCLUSIONS: Moderate-to-severe fetal anemia can be detected non-invasively by MRI with high sensitivity and specificity. Our results suggest an adjunct role for MRI in fetuses with suspected anemia, particularly following previous transfusion and in late gestation.
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