Parturition

Parturition is a topic covered in the Ob/Gyn Hospitalists' Core Competencies.

To view the entire topic, please or .

OB/GYN Hospitalist Resource Center from Society of OB/GYN Hospitalists (SOGH) powered by Unbound Medicine provides safety and quality information for obstetrics and gynecology hospitalist professionals. Explore these free sample topics:

-- The first section of this topic is shown below --

Vaginal delivery is one of the most common procedures performed in the United States, with more than 2.6 million performed in 2017.[1] Because of the increased risks and cost associated with cesarean delivery, vaginal birth is the goal for most low-risk pregnancies. The likelihood of vaginal delivery may be influenced by several factors such as maternal age, height, body mass index, parity, cervical dilation on admission for labor, and presence or absence of pregnancy complications. OB/GYN hospitalists should be familiar with evidence-based labor management and techniques that affect patient satisfaction. The care team must also be well versed in preventing and managing complications of delivery such as obstetric lacerations, shoulder dystocia, and postpartum hemorrhage. OB/GYN hospitalists who adhere to best practice in the management of labor and delivery are well positioned to increase the likelihood of vaginal delivery, avoid unnecessary cesarean delivery, and optimize the inpatient obstetric experience.

-- To view the remaining sections of this topic, please or --

Vaginal delivery is one of the most common procedures performed in the United States, with more than 2.6 million performed in 2017.[1] Because of the increased risks and cost associated with cesarean delivery, vaginal birth is the goal for most low-risk pregnancies. The likelihood of vaginal delivery may be influenced by several factors such as maternal age, height, body mass index, parity, cervical dilation on admission for labor, and presence or absence of pregnancy complications. OB/GYN hospitalists should be familiar with evidence-based labor management and techniques that affect patient satisfaction. The care team must also be well versed in preventing and managing complications of delivery such as obstetric lacerations, shoulder dystocia, and postpartum hemorrhage. OB/GYN hospitalists who adhere to best practice in the management of labor and delivery are well positioned to increase the likelihood of vaginal delivery, avoid unnecessary cesarean delivery, and optimize the inpatient obstetric experience.

There's more to see -- the rest of this topic is available only to subscribers.

Last updated: August 30, 2021