Community-Acquired Pneumonia

Community-Acquired Pneumonia is a topic covered in the Washington Manual of Medical Therapeutics.

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General Principles

  • The predominant organism involved is S. pneumoniae; other bacterial etiologies are H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis. Pneumonia caused by atypical agents, such as Legionella pneumophila, C. pneumoniae, or M. pneumoniae, cannot be reliably distinguished clinically. Influenza, SARS-CoV-2, and other respiratory viruses may also cause pneumonia in adults.
  • Community-acquired MRSA is an important cause of severe, necrotizing pneumonia.
  • Patients aged 65 years or older, and those with certain medical conditions, should receive the pneumococcal vaccination with both the 23-valent and the 13-valent vaccine, as recommended per CDC guidelines.1

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General Principles

  • The predominant organism involved is S. pneumoniae; other bacterial etiologies are H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis. Pneumonia caused by atypical agents, such as Legionella pneumophila, C. pneumoniae, or M. pneumoniae, cannot be reliably distinguished clinically. Influenza, SARS-CoV-2, and other respiratory viruses may also cause pneumonia in adults.
  • Community-acquired MRSA is an important cause of severe, necrotizing pneumonia.
  • Patients aged 65 years or older, and those with certain medical conditions, should receive the pneumococcal vaccination with both the 23-valent and the 13-valent vaccine, as recommended per CDC guidelines.1

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