Tigecycline

Tigecycline is a topic covered in the Washington Manual of Medical Therapeutics.

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General Principles

Tigecycline (100 mg IV loading dose, then 50 mg IV q12h) is the only FDA-approved antibiotic in the class of glycylcyclines. Its mechanism of action is similar to that of tetracyclines; the addition of the glycyl side chain expands its activity against bacterial pathogens that are normally resistant to tetracyclines. It has a broad spectrum of bactericidal activity against gram-positive, gram-negative, and anaerobic bacteria except P. aeruginosa and some Proteus isolates. It is FDA approved for treatment of complicated skin and skin structure infections, complicated intra-abdominal infections, and community-acquired pneumonia, but it should be reserved for use when alternative treatments are not suitable. It may be used for treatment of infections due to susceptible strains of VRE and some multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria. Because of low achievable blood concentrations, tigecycline should not be used to treat primary bacteremia.

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General Principles

Tigecycline (100 mg IV loading dose, then 50 mg IV q12h) is the only FDA-approved antibiotic in the class of glycylcyclines. Its mechanism of action is similar to that of tetracyclines; the addition of the glycyl side chain expands its activity against bacterial pathogens that are normally resistant to tetracyclines. It has a broad spectrum of bactericidal activity against gram-positive, gram-negative, and anaerobic bacteria except P. aeruginosa and some Proteus isolates. It is FDA approved for treatment of complicated skin and skin structure infections, complicated intra-abdominal infections, and community-acquired pneumonia, but it should be reserved for use when alternative treatments are not suitable. It may be used for treatment of infections due to susceptible strains of VRE and some multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria. Because of low achievable blood concentrations, tigecycline should not be used to treat primary bacteremia.

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