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An investigation of the relationship between vitamin B12 deficiency and HIV infection.

Abstract

The symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency and several symptoms common to HIV infection overlap. Additionally, persons with HIV infection have frequently been found to have vitamin B12 deficiency. Therefore, the issue of concern is the prevalence of B12 deficiency in HIV-infected persons. A retrospective study of 63 medical records in a midwestern urban veterans affairs medical center provided the data for this study. Data were collected and analyzed for relationships among B12 levels, certain hematologic components, medications, symptomatology, and immune status. A chi-square goodness-of-fit test demonstrated a significant prevalence of B12 deficiency among persons with HIV disease, and chi-square two-way tables demonstrated significant relationships between B12 deficiency and weight loss and diarrhea. Prevalence of B12 deficiency in persons with HIV infection has been shown to be significant, indicating that B12 deficiency screening in persons with HIV infection may need be done to aid the health care provider in planning the best possible care. Further research is needed to corroborate these findings.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    Indiana University, Indianapolis Department of Medicine, USA.

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    CD4-CD8 Ratio
    Chi-Square Distribution
    Diarrhea
    HIV Infections
    Hematocrit
    Hemoglobins
    Humans
    Male
    Mass Screening
    Middle Aged
    Prevalence
    Quality of Life
    Retrospective Studies
    Risk Factors
    Vitamin B 12
    Vitamin B 12 Deficiency
    Weight Loss

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    10670004

    Citation

    Balt, C A.. "An Investigation of the Relationship Between Vitamin B12 Deficiency and HIV Infection." The Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care : JANAC, vol. 11, no. 1, 2000, pp. 24-8, 31-5.
    Balt CA. An investigation of the relationship between vitamin B12 deficiency and HIV infection. J Assoc Nurses AIDS Care. 2000;11(1):24-8, 31-5.
    Balt, C. A. (2000). An investigation of the relationship between vitamin B12 deficiency and HIV infection. The Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care : JANAC, 11(1), pp. 24-8, 31-5.
    Balt CA. An Investigation of the Relationship Between Vitamin B12 Deficiency and HIV Infection. J Assoc Nurses AIDS Care. 2000;11(1):24-8, 31-5. PubMed PMID: 10670004.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - An investigation of the relationship between vitamin B12 deficiency and HIV infection. A1 - Balt,C A, PY - 2000/2/12/pubmed PY - 2000/2/26/medline PY - 2000/2/12/entrez SP - 24-8, 31-5 JF - The Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care : JANAC JO - J Assoc Nurses AIDS Care VL - 11 IS - 1 N2 - The symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency and several symptoms common to HIV infection overlap. Additionally, persons with HIV infection have frequently been found to have vitamin B12 deficiency. Therefore, the issue of concern is the prevalence of B12 deficiency in HIV-infected persons. A retrospective study of 63 medical records in a midwestern urban veterans affairs medical center provided the data for this study. Data were collected and analyzed for relationships among B12 levels, certain hematologic components, medications, symptomatology, and immune status. A chi-square goodness-of-fit test demonstrated a significant prevalence of B12 deficiency among persons with HIV disease, and chi-square two-way tables demonstrated significant relationships between B12 deficiency and weight loss and diarrhea. Prevalence of B12 deficiency in persons with HIV infection has been shown to be significant, indicating that B12 deficiency screening in persons with HIV infection may need be done to aid the health care provider in planning the best possible care. Further research is needed to corroborate these findings. SN - 1055-3290 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10670004/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1055-3290(06)60419-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -