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Age-specific causes of bilateral visual impairment.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To describe the age-specific prevalence of common eye diseases causing bilateral visual impairment and estimate the total number of Australians with cause-specific visual impairment.

METHODS

Cluster-stratified random sample of 5147 residents aged 40 years and older from urban and rural areas and aged-care facilities. Participants completed a standardized interview and eye examination. Four levels of bilateral visual impairment were defined: less than 20/40 to 20/60 and/or homonymous hemianopia (mild), less than 20/60 to 20/200 or better and/or less than 20 degrees to 10 degrees radius field (moderate), less than 20/200 to 10/200 and/or less than 10 degrees to 5 degrees radius field (severe), and less than 1O/ 200 and/or less than 50 radius field (profound). The major cause of vision loss was identified for all participants found to be visually impaired.

RESULTS

Uncorrected refractive error was the most common cause of bilateral visual impairment across all decades of life, rising from 0.5% in 40- to 49-year-olds to 13% among those aged 80 years and older. Prevalence of visual impairment due to diabetic retinopathy was 0.7% in 50- to 59-year-olds and 0.8% in those older than 80 years. Visual impairment due to glaucoma had a prevalence of 0.7% among 60-year-olds and rose to 4% of those older than 90 years. The prevalence of visual impairment due to cataract (only present in those aged 70 years or older) rose from 0.6% to 11% in those older than 90 years, and the prevalence of visual impairment due to age-related macular degeneration rose from 0.8% to 16% in those older than 90 years.

CONCLUSIONS

The predominant causes of visual impairment change with age. Recognition of these patterns is fundamental for early diagnosis and treatment of eye disease and, where appropriate, referral for rehabilitation.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Centre for Eye Research Australia, University of Melbourne, Australia. leann@iris.medoph.unimelb.edu.au

    , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Age Factors
    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Eye Diseases
    Female
    Humans
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Prevalence
    Rural Population
    Urban Population
    Victoria
    Vision Disorders
    Visual Acuity
    Visually Impaired Persons

    Pub Type(s)

    Clinical Trial
    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    10676793

    Citation

    Weih, L M., et al. "Age-specific Causes of Bilateral Visual Impairment." Archives of Ophthalmology (Chicago, Ill. : 1960), vol. 118, no. 2, 2000, pp. 264-9.
    Weih LM, VanNewkirk MR, McCarty CA, et al. Age-specific causes of bilateral visual impairment. Arch Ophthalmol. 2000;118(2):264-9.
    Weih, L. M., VanNewkirk, M. R., McCarty, C. A., & Taylor, H. R. (2000). Age-specific causes of bilateral visual impairment. Archives of Ophthalmology (Chicago, Ill. : 1960), 118(2), pp. 264-9.
    Weih LM, et al. Age-specific Causes of Bilateral Visual Impairment. Arch Ophthalmol. 2000;118(2):264-9. PubMed PMID: 10676793.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Age-specific causes of bilateral visual impairment. AU - Weih,L M, AU - VanNewkirk,M R, AU - McCarty,C A, AU - Taylor,H R, PY - 2000/2/17/pubmed PY - 2000/2/19/medline PY - 2000/2/17/entrez SP - 264 EP - 9 JF - Archives of ophthalmology (Chicago, Ill. : 1960) JO - Arch. Ophthalmol. VL - 118 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To describe the age-specific prevalence of common eye diseases causing bilateral visual impairment and estimate the total number of Australians with cause-specific visual impairment. METHODS: Cluster-stratified random sample of 5147 residents aged 40 years and older from urban and rural areas and aged-care facilities. Participants completed a standardized interview and eye examination. Four levels of bilateral visual impairment were defined: less than 20/40 to 20/60 and/or homonymous hemianopia (mild), less than 20/60 to 20/200 or better and/or less than 20 degrees to 10 degrees radius field (moderate), less than 20/200 to 10/200 and/or less than 10 degrees to 5 degrees radius field (severe), and less than 1O/ 200 and/or less than 50 radius field (profound). The major cause of vision loss was identified for all participants found to be visually impaired. RESULTS: Uncorrected refractive error was the most common cause of bilateral visual impairment across all decades of life, rising from 0.5% in 40- to 49-year-olds to 13% among those aged 80 years and older. Prevalence of visual impairment due to diabetic retinopathy was 0.7% in 50- to 59-year-olds and 0.8% in those older than 80 years. Visual impairment due to glaucoma had a prevalence of 0.7% among 60-year-olds and rose to 4% of those older than 90 years. The prevalence of visual impairment due to cataract (only present in those aged 70 years or older) rose from 0.6% to 11% in those older than 90 years, and the prevalence of visual impairment due to age-related macular degeneration rose from 0.8% to 16% in those older than 90 years. CONCLUSIONS: The predominant causes of visual impairment change with age. Recognition of these patterns is fundamental for early diagnosis and treatment of eye disease and, where appropriate, referral for rehabilitation. SN - 0003-9950 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10676793/full_citation L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaophthalmology/fullarticle/vol/118/pg/264 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -