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Hallucinations in Parkinson's disease: prevalence, phenomenology and risk factors.

Abstract

Hallucinations, mainly of a visual nature, are considered to affect about one-quarter of patients with Parkinson's disease. They are commonly viewed as a side-effect of antiparkinsonian treatment, but other factors may be involved. The aim of this study was to determine the phenomenology, prevalence and risk factors of hallucinations in Parkinson's disease. Two-hundred and sixteen consecutive patients fulfilling clinical criteria for Parkinson's disease were studied. Demographic and clinical variables were recorded, including motor and cognitive status, depressive symptoms and sleep-wake disturbances. Patients with and without hallucinations were compared using non-parametric tests, and logistic regression was applied to significant data. Hallucinations had been present during the previous 3 months in 39.8% of the patients, and fell into three categories: minor forms, consisting of a sensation of a presence (person), a sideways passage (commonly of an animal) or illusions were present in 25.5% of the patients (an isolated occurrence in 14.3%), formed visual hallucinations were present in 22.2% (isolated in 9.3%) and auditory hallucinations were present in 9.7% (isolated in 2.3%). Patients with minor hallucinations had a higher depression score than non-hallucinators but did not differ in other respects. Logistic regression analysis identified three factors independently predictive of formed visual hallucinations: severe cognitive disorders, daytime somnolence and a long duration of Parkinson's disease. These findings indicate that, when minor hallucinations are included, the total prevalence is much higher than previously reported. A simple side-effect of dopaminergic treatment is not sufficient to explain the occurrence of all visual hallucinations. The main risk factor in treated patients is cognitive impairment, although sleep-wake cycle disturbances, and possibly other factors related to the duration of the disease, act as cofactors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

,

Department of Neurology, Hôpital Tenon, Paris, France. gilles.fenelon@tnn.ap-hop-paris.fr

, ,

Source

Brain : a journal of neurology 123 ( Pt 4): 2000 Apr pg 733-45

MeSH

Aged
Female
Hallucinations
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Parkinson Disease
Risk Factors

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10734005

Citation

Fénelon, G, et al. "Hallucinations in Parkinson's Disease: Prevalence, Phenomenology and Risk Factors." Brain : a Journal of Neurology, vol. 123 ( Pt 4), 2000, pp. 733-45.
Fénelon G, Mahieux F, Huon R, et al. Hallucinations in Parkinson's disease: prevalence, phenomenology and risk factors. Brain. 2000;123 ( Pt 4):733-45.
Fénelon, G., Mahieux, F., Huon, R., & Ziégler, M. (2000). Hallucinations in Parkinson's disease: prevalence, phenomenology and risk factors. Brain : a Journal of Neurology, 123 ( Pt 4), pp. 733-45.
Fénelon G, et al. Hallucinations in Parkinson's Disease: Prevalence, Phenomenology and Risk Factors. Brain. 2000;123 ( Pt 4):733-45. PubMed PMID: 10734005.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hallucinations in Parkinson's disease: prevalence, phenomenology and risk factors. AU - Fénelon,G, AU - Mahieux,F, AU - Huon,R, AU - Ziégler,M, PY - 2000/3/29/pubmed PY - 2000/5/8/medline PY - 2000/3/29/entrez SP - 733 EP - 45 JF - Brain : a journal of neurology JO - Brain VL - 123 ( Pt 4) N2 - Hallucinations, mainly of a visual nature, are considered to affect about one-quarter of patients with Parkinson's disease. They are commonly viewed as a side-effect of antiparkinsonian treatment, but other factors may be involved. The aim of this study was to determine the phenomenology, prevalence and risk factors of hallucinations in Parkinson's disease. Two-hundred and sixteen consecutive patients fulfilling clinical criteria for Parkinson's disease were studied. Demographic and clinical variables were recorded, including motor and cognitive status, depressive symptoms and sleep-wake disturbances. Patients with and without hallucinations were compared using non-parametric tests, and logistic regression was applied to significant data. Hallucinations had been present during the previous 3 months in 39.8% of the patients, and fell into three categories: minor forms, consisting of a sensation of a presence (person), a sideways passage (commonly of an animal) or illusions were present in 25.5% of the patients (an isolated occurrence in 14.3%), formed visual hallucinations were present in 22.2% (isolated in 9.3%) and auditory hallucinations were present in 9.7% (isolated in 2.3%). Patients with minor hallucinations had a higher depression score than non-hallucinators but did not differ in other respects. Logistic regression analysis identified three factors independently predictive of formed visual hallucinations: severe cognitive disorders, daytime somnolence and a long duration of Parkinson's disease. These findings indicate that, when minor hallucinations are included, the total prevalence is much higher than previously reported. A simple side-effect of dopaminergic treatment is not sufficient to explain the occurrence of all visual hallucinations. The main risk factor in treated patients is cognitive impairment, although sleep-wake cycle disturbances, and possibly other factors related to the duration of the disease, act as cofactors. SN - 0006-8950 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10734005/full_citation L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/parkinsonsdisease.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -