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Intake of flavonoids, carotenoids, vitamins C and E, and risk of stroke in male smokers.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE

Antioxidants may protect against atherosclerosis and thus prevent cerebrovascular disease. We studied the association between dietary antioxidants and subtypes of stroke.

METHODS

The study cohort consisted of 26 593 male smokers, aged 50 to 69 years, without a history of stroke. They were participants of the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study in Finland. The men completed a validated dietary questionnaire at baseline. Incident cases were identified through national registers.

RESULTS

During a 6.1-year follow-up, 736 cerebral infarctions, 83 subarachnoid hemorrhages, and 95 intracerebral hemorrhages occurred. Neither dietary flavonols and flavones nor vitamin E were associated with risk for stroke. The dietary intake of beta-carotene was inversely associated with the risk for cerebral infarction (relative risk [RR] of highest versus lowest quartile 0.74, 95% CI 0.60 to 0. 91), lutein plus zeaxanthin with risk for subarachnoid hemorrhage (RR 0.47, 95% CI 0.24 to 0.93), and lycopene with risks of cerebral infarction (RR 0.74, 95% CI 0.59 to 0.92) and intracerebral hemorrhage (RR 0.45, 95% CI 0.24 to 0.86). Vitamin C intake was inversely associated with the risk for intracerebral hemorrhage (RR 0.39, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.74). After simultaneous modeling of the antioxidants, a significant association remained only between beta-carotene intake and risk for cerebral infarction (RR 0.77, 95% CI 0.61 to 0.99).

CONCLUSIONS

Dietary intake of beta-carotene was inversely associated with the risk for cerebral infarction. No association was detected between other dietary antioxidants and risk for stroke.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Nutrition, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.

    , , ,

    Source

    Stroke 31:10 2000 Oct pg 2301-6

    MeSH

    Aged
    Ascorbic Acid
    Carotenoids
    Cerebral Hemorrhage
    Cerebral Infarction
    Cohort Studies
    Comorbidity
    Diet
    Finland
    Flavonoids
    Follow-Up Studies
    Humans
    Incidence
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Risk
    Risk Assessment
    Smoking
    Stroke
    Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
    Vitamin E
    Vitamins
    beta Carotene

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    11022054

    Citation

    Hirvonen, T, et al. "Intake of Flavonoids, Carotenoids, Vitamins C and E, and Risk of Stroke in Male Smokers." Stroke, vol. 31, no. 10, 2000, pp. 2301-6.
    Hirvonen T, Virtamo J, Korhonen P, et al. Intake of flavonoids, carotenoids, vitamins C and E, and risk of stroke in male smokers. Stroke. 2000;31(10):2301-6.
    Hirvonen, T., Virtamo, J., Korhonen, P., Albanes, D., & Pietinen, P. (2000). Intake of flavonoids, carotenoids, vitamins C and E, and risk of stroke in male smokers. Stroke, 31(10), pp. 2301-6.
    Hirvonen T, et al. Intake of Flavonoids, Carotenoids, Vitamins C and E, and Risk of Stroke in Male Smokers. Stroke. 2000;31(10):2301-6. PubMed PMID: 11022054.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Intake of flavonoids, carotenoids, vitamins C and E, and risk of stroke in male smokers. AU - Hirvonen,T, AU - Virtamo,J, AU - Korhonen,P, AU - Albanes,D, AU - Pietinen,P, PY - 2000/10/7/pubmed PY - 2001/2/28/medline PY - 2000/10/7/entrez SP - 2301 EP - 6 JF - Stroke JO - Stroke VL - 31 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Antioxidants may protect against atherosclerosis and thus prevent cerebrovascular disease. We studied the association between dietary antioxidants and subtypes of stroke. METHODS: The study cohort consisted of 26 593 male smokers, aged 50 to 69 years, without a history of stroke. They were participants of the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study in Finland. The men completed a validated dietary questionnaire at baseline. Incident cases were identified through national registers. RESULTS: During a 6.1-year follow-up, 736 cerebral infarctions, 83 subarachnoid hemorrhages, and 95 intracerebral hemorrhages occurred. Neither dietary flavonols and flavones nor vitamin E were associated with risk for stroke. The dietary intake of beta-carotene was inversely associated with the risk for cerebral infarction (relative risk [RR] of highest versus lowest quartile 0.74, 95% CI 0.60 to 0. 91), lutein plus zeaxanthin with risk for subarachnoid hemorrhage (RR 0.47, 95% CI 0.24 to 0.93), and lycopene with risks of cerebral infarction (RR 0.74, 95% CI 0.59 to 0.92) and intracerebral hemorrhage (RR 0.45, 95% CI 0.24 to 0.86). Vitamin C intake was inversely associated with the risk for intracerebral hemorrhage (RR 0.39, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.74). After simultaneous modeling of the antioxidants, a significant association remained only between beta-carotene intake and risk for cerebral infarction (RR 0.77, 95% CI 0.61 to 0.99). CONCLUSIONS: Dietary intake of beta-carotene was inversely associated with the risk for cerebral infarction. No association was detected between other dietary antioxidants and risk for stroke. SN - 1524-4628 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11022054/full_citation L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=11022054 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -