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Dietary habits and right-sided colonic diverticulosis.
Dis Colon Rectum 2000; 43(10):1412-8DC

Abstract

PURPOSE

In Asian populations, there is a high prevalence of right-sided colonic diverticulosis, the cause of which is uncertain. It is suspected that dietary habits may interact with a congenital predilection to cause this condition. To evaluate the relationship between long-term dietary habits and the prevalence of right-sided diverticulosis in the general population, we performed a retrospective case-control study.

METHODS

We reviewed the records of 3,105 screening colonoscopies performed on healthy, asymptomatic adults. All cases of right-sided diverticulosis were selected, and a similar number of gender-matched and age-matched controls with negative colonoscopies were randomly sampled from the same cohort. All case and control subjects were interviewed by a single-blinded nurse to establish their dietary habits during the past decade, in addition to other demographic characteristics. Based on consumption frequency, they were assigned to one of three diet classes for each of three food categories of interest: meat, vegetable, and fruit products. Staple foods such as rice were not included. Odds ratios were then calculated using multivariate conditional logistic regression and tests for trend were performed.

RESULTS

A total of 86 cases of right-sided diverticulosis were included, whereas 106 controls were randomly selected. There was a marked association between meat consumption frequency and right-sided diverticulosis, with a trend P value of <0.01 and an odds ratio of 24.81 between the most and least frequent consumers of meat products.

CONCLUSIONS

The prevalence of right-sided diverticulosis is strongly positively associated with past meat consumption frequency. There is no association with vegetable or fruit consumption frequency, laxative use, supplemental fiber intake, smoking, or family history.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Gastroenterology, ChangHua Christian Medical Center, Taiwan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11052519

Citation

Lin, O S., et al. "Dietary Habits and Right-sided Colonic Diverticulosis." Diseases of the Colon and Rectum, vol. 43, no. 10, 2000, pp. 1412-8.
Lin OS, Soon MS, Wu SS, et al. Dietary habits and right-sided colonic diverticulosis. Dis Colon Rectum. 2000;43(10):1412-8.
Lin, O. S., Soon, M. S., Wu, S. S., Chen, Y. Y., Hwang, K. L., & Triadafilopoulos, G. (2000). Dietary habits and right-sided colonic diverticulosis. Diseases of the Colon and Rectum, 43(10), pp. 1412-8.
Lin OS, et al. Dietary Habits and Right-sided Colonic Diverticulosis. Dis Colon Rectum. 2000;43(10):1412-8. PubMed PMID: 11052519.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary habits and right-sided colonic diverticulosis. AU - Lin,O S, AU - Soon,M S, AU - Wu,S S, AU - Chen,Y Y, AU - Hwang,K L, AU - Triadafilopoulos,G, PY - 2000/10/29/pubmed PY - 2001/2/28/medline PY - 2000/10/29/entrez SP - 1412 EP - 8 JF - Diseases of the colon and rectum JO - Dis. Colon Rectum VL - 43 IS - 10 N2 - PURPOSE: In Asian populations, there is a high prevalence of right-sided colonic diverticulosis, the cause of which is uncertain. It is suspected that dietary habits may interact with a congenital predilection to cause this condition. To evaluate the relationship between long-term dietary habits and the prevalence of right-sided diverticulosis in the general population, we performed a retrospective case-control study. METHODS: We reviewed the records of 3,105 screening colonoscopies performed on healthy, asymptomatic adults. All cases of right-sided diverticulosis were selected, and a similar number of gender-matched and age-matched controls with negative colonoscopies were randomly sampled from the same cohort. All case and control subjects were interviewed by a single-blinded nurse to establish their dietary habits during the past decade, in addition to other demographic characteristics. Based on consumption frequency, they were assigned to one of three diet classes for each of three food categories of interest: meat, vegetable, and fruit products. Staple foods such as rice were not included. Odds ratios were then calculated using multivariate conditional logistic regression and tests for trend were performed. RESULTS: A total of 86 cases of right-sided diverticulosis were included, whereas 106 controls were randomly selected. There was a marked association between meat consumption frequency and right-sided diverticulosis, with a trend P value of <0.01 and an odds ratio of 24.81 between the most and least frequent consumers of meat products. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of right-sided diverticulosis is strongly positively associated with past meat consumption frequency. There is no association with vegetable or fruit consumption frequency, laxative use, supplemental fiber intake, smoking, or family history. SN - 0012-3706 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11052519/full_citation L2 - http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/bf02236638 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -