Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Breast feeding and the intestinal microflora of the infant--implications for protection against infectious diseases.

Abstract

Human breast milk contains an array of factors with anti-infectious potential, such as immunoglobulins (especially secretory IgA), oligosaccharides and glycoproteins with anti-adhesive capacity, and cytokines. Breast-feeding is associated with protection from the following infections or infection-related conditions: gastroenteritis, upper and lower respiratory tract infection, acute otitis media, urinary tract infection, neonatal septicaemia and necrotizing enterocolitis. Some of the protective effects may derive from an altered mucosal colonization pattern in the breast-fed infant. In other instances breast-fed infants develop less symptoms to the same microbe which causes disease in the bottle-fed infant. An example of an altered colonization pattern is that breast-fed infants have less P-fimbriated, but more type 1-fimbriated E. coli. This may protect against urinary tract infection in the breast-fed infant since P. fimbriae are the major virulence factor for urinary tract infection. An example of changed consequences of the same microbial colonization is that secretory IgA in the breast-milk protects very efficiently from translocation of intestinal bacteria across the gut mucosa by coating intestinal bacteria and blocking their interaction with the epithelium. This mechanism may protect the infant from septicaemia of gut origin and, possibly, necrotizing enterocolitis. Breast-milk is also highly anti-inflammatogenic and contains hormone like factors which counteract diarrhea. Thus, breast-fed infants may be colonized by recognized diarrheal pathogens and still remain healthy. Due to a less virulent intestinal microflora and decreased translocation breast-fed infants will obtain less stimuli for the gut immune system, resulting, in e.g., lower salivary IgA antibody titres.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Clinical Immunology, Göteborg University, Sweden.

    Source

    MeSH

    Adjuvants, Immunologic
    Bacterial Translocation
    Breast Feeding
    Communicable Diseases
    Cytokines
    Female
    Humans
    Immunity, Maternally-Acquired
    Immunoglobulin A, Secretory
    Infant
    Infant, Newborn
    Intestines
    Milk, Human
    Virulence

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    11065062

    Citation

    Wold, A E., and I Adlerberth. "Breast Feeding and the Intestinal Microflora of the Infant--implications for Protection Against Infectious Diseases." Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, vol. 478, 2000, pp. 77-93.
    Wold AE, Adlerberth I. Breast feeding and the intestinal microflora of the infant--implications for protection against infectious diseases. Adv Exp Med Biol. 2000;478:77-93.
    Wold, A. E., & Adlerberth, I. (2000). Breast feeding and the intestinal microflora of the infant--implications for protection against infectious diseases. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, 478, pp. 77-93.
    Wold AE, Adlerberth I. Breast Feeding and the Intestinal Microflora of the Infant--implications for Protection Against Infectious Diseases. Adv Exp Med Biol. 2000;478:77-93. PubMed PMID: 11065062.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Breast feeding and the intestinal microflora of the infant--implications for protection against infectious diseases. AU - Wold,A E, AU - Adlerberth,I, PY - 2000/11/7/pubmed PY - 2001/10/12/medline PY - 2000/11/7/entrez SP - 77 EP - 93 JF - Advances in experimental medicine and biology JO - Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. VL - 478 N2 - Human breast milk contains an array of factors with anti-infectious potential, such as immunoglobulins (especially secretory IgA), oligosaccharides and glycoproteins with anti-adhesive capacity, and cytokines. Breast-feeding is associated with protection from the following infections or infection-related conditions: gastroenteritis, upper and lower respiratory tract infection, acute otitis media, urinary tract infection, neonatal septicaemia and necrotizing enterocolitis. Some of the protective effects may derive from an altered mucosal colonization pattern in the breast-fed infant. In other instances breast-fed infants develop less symptoms to the same microbe which causes disease in the bottle-fed infant. An example of an altered colonization pattern is that breast-fed infants have less P-fimbriated, but more type 1-fimbriated E. coli. This may protect against urinary tract infection in the breast-fed infant since P. fimbriae are the major virulence factor for urinary tract infection. An example of changed consequences of the same microbial colonization is that secretory IgA in the breast-milk protects very efficiently from translocation of intestinal bacteria across the gut mucosa by coating intestinal bacteria and blocking their interaction with the epithelium. This mechanism may protect the infant from septicaemia of gut origin and, possibly, necrotizing enterocolitis. Breast-milk is also highly anti-inflammatogenic and contains hormone like factors which counteract diarrhea. Thus, breast-fed infants may be colonized by recognized diarrheal pathogens and still remain healthy. Due to a less virulent intestinal microflora and decreased translocation breast-fed infants will obtain less stimuli for the gut immune system, resulting, in e.g., lower salivary IgA antibody titres. SN - 0065-2598 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11065062/full_citation L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/0-306-46830-1_7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -