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Contribution of dietary protein to sulfide production in the large intestine: an in vitro and a controlled feeding study in humans.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Hydrogen sulfide is a luminally acting, bacterially derived cell poison that has been implicated in ulcerative colitis. Sulfide generation in the colon is probably driven by dietary components such as sulfur-containing amino acids (SAAs) and inorganic sulfur (eg, sulfite).

OBJECTIVE

We assessed the contribution of SAAs from meat to sulfide production by intestinal bacteria with use of both a model culture system in vitro and an in vivo human feeding study.

DESIGN

Five healthy men were housed in a metabolic suite and fed a sequence of 5 diets for 10 d each. Meat intake ranged from 0 g/d with a vegetarian diet to 600 g/d with a high-meat diet. Fecal sulfide and urinary sulfate were measured in samples collected on days 9 and 10 of each diet period. Additionally, 5 or 10 g bovine serum albumin or casein/L was added to batch cultures inoculated with feces from 4 healthy volunteers. Concentrations of sulfide, ammonia, and Lowry-reactive substances were measured over 48 h.

RESULTS

Mean (+/-SEM) fecal sulfide concentrations ranged from 0.22 +/- 0.02 mmol/kg with the 0-g/d diet to 3.38 +/- 0.31 mmol/kg with the 600-g/d diet and were significantly related to meat intake (P: < 0.001). Sulfide formation in fecal batch cultures supplemented with both bovine serum albumin and casein correlated with protein digestion, as measured by the disappearance of Lowry-reactive substances and the appearance of ammonia.

CONCLUSION

Dietary protein from meat is an important substrate for sulfide generation by bacteria in the human large intestine.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Dunn Clinical Nutrition Centre, Hills Road, Cambridge, United Kingdom. e.magee@dundee.ac.uk

    , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Amino Acids, Sulfur
    Cross-Over Studies
    Diet
    Dietary Proteins
    Feces
    Humans
    Intestine, Large
    Male
    Meat
    Middle Aged
    Regression Analysis
    Sulfates
    Sulfides

    Pub Type(s)

    Clinical Trial
    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    11101476

    Citation

    Magee, E A., et al. "Contribution of Dietary Protein to Sulfide Production in the Large Intestine: an in Vitro and a Controlled Feeding Study in Humans." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 72, no. 6, 2000, pp. 1488-94.
    Magee EA, Richardson CJ, Hughes R, et al. Contribution of dietary protein to sulfide production in the large intestine: an in vitro and a controlled feeding study in humans. Am J Clin Nutr. 2000;72(6):1488-94.
    Magee, E. A., Richardson, C. J., Hughes, R., & Cummings, J. H. (2000). Contribution of dietary protein to sulfide production in the large intestine: an in vitro and a controlled feeding study in humans. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 72(6), pp. 1488-94.
    Magee EA, et al. Contribution of Dietary Protein to Sulfide Production in the Large Intestine: an in Vitro and a Controlled Feeding Study in Humans. Am J Clin Nutr. 2000;72(6):1488-94. PubMed PMID: 11101476.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Contribution of dietary protein to sulfide production in the large intestine: an in vitro and a controlled feeding study in humans. AU - Magee,E A, AU - Richardson,C J, AU - Hughes,R, AU - Cummings,J H, PY - 2000/12/2/pubmed PY - 2001/2/28/medline PY - 2000/12/2/entrez SP - 1488 EP - 94 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 72 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Hydrogen sulfide is a luminally acting, bacterially derived cell poison that has been implicated in ulcerative colitis. Sulfide generation in the colon is probably driven by dietary components such as sulfur-containing amino acids (SAAs) and inorganic sulfur (eg, sulfite). OBJECTIVE: We assessed the contribution of SAAs from meat to sulfide production by intestinal bacteria with use of both a model culture system in vitro and an in vivo human feeding study. DESIGN: Five healthy men were housed in a metabolic suite and fed a sequence of 5 diets for 10 d each. Meat intake ranged from 0 g/d with a vegetarian diet to 600 g/d with a high-meat diet. Fecal sulfide and urinary sulfate were measured in samples collected on days 9 and 10 of each diet period. Additionally, 5 or 10 g bovine serum albumin or casein/L was added to batch cultures inoculated with feces from 4 healthy volunteers. Concentrations of sulfide, ammonia, and Lowry-reactive substances were measured over 48 h. RESULTS: Mean (+/-SEM) fecal sulfide concentrations ranged from 0.22 +/- 0.02 mmol/kg with the 0-g/d diet to 3.38 +/- 0.31 mmol/kg with the 600-g/d diet and were significantly related to meat intake (P: < 0.001). Sulfide formation in fecal batch cultures supplemented with both bovine serum albumin and casein correlated with protein digestion, as measured by the disappearance of Lowry-reactive substances and the appearance of ammonia. CONCLUSION: Dietary protein from meat is an important substrate for sulfide generation by bacteria in the human large intestine. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11101476/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/72.6.1488 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -