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Margarine consumption and allergy in children.

Abstract

Dietary fat consumption is hypothesized to influence atopy development by modulation of IgE production. The aim of our study was to assess whether margarine consumption is associated with allergic sensitization and diseases in children. Data of a cross-sectional health survey in 1998-1999 comprising 2,348 children age 5 to 14 yr were analyzed. Information on type of fat used as spread during the past 12 mo, children's health, and sociodemographic factors were gathered by questionnaire. Allergic sensitization to common aeroallergens was assessed by specific serum IgE. Compared with butter consumption, margarine consumption was associated with allergic sensitization (adjusted odds ratio 1.30 [95% confidence interval: 1.01 to 1.67]) and with rhinitis symptoms during the past 12 mo (1.41 [1.01 to 1.97]). Sex-stratified analysis showed that these associations were limited to boys (boys: sensitization 1.57 [1.12 to 2.20], rhinitis symptoms 1.76 [1.12 to 2.78]; girls: sensitization 0.99 [0.67 to 1.46], rhinitis symptoms 1.03 [0.63 to 1.70]). No statistically significant relation was observed between exclusive margarine consumption and ever physician-diagnosed hay fever or asthma in all children. In conclusion, the sex difference in the association of margarine consumption with allergic sensitization was in accordance with the higher IgE concentrations and atopy prevalence in boys compared with girls. Increased intake of certain polyunsaturated fatty acids might further stimulate IgE production in boys.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    GSF National Research Center for Environment and Health, Institute of Epidemiology, Neuherberg, Germany. bolte@gsf.de

    , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Child
    Child, Preschool
    Female
    Food Hypersensitivity
    Humans
    Male
    Margarine
    Respiratory Hypersensitivity
    Surveys and Questionnaires

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    11208657

    Citation

    Bolte, G, et al. "Margarine Consumption and Allergy in Children." American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, vol. 163, no. 1, 2001, pp. 277-9.
    Bolte G, Frye C, Hoelscher B, et al. Margarine consumption and allergy in children. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001;163(1):277-9.
    Bolte, G., Frye, C., Hoelscher, B., Meyer, I., Wjst, M., & Heinrich, J. (2001). Margarine consumption and allergy in children. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 163(1), pp. 277-9.
    Bolte G, et al. Margarine Consumption and Allergy in Children. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001;163(1):277-9. PubMed PMID: 11208657.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Margarine consumption and allergy in children. AU - Bolte,G, AU - Frye,C, AU - Hoelscher,B, AU - Meyer,I, AU - Wjst,M, AU - Heinrich,J, PY - 2001/2/24/pubmed PY - 2001/6/2/medline PY - 2001/2/24/entrez SP - 277 EP - 9 JF - American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine JO - Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. VL - 163 IS - 1 N2 - Dietary fat consumption is hypothesized to influence atopy development by modulation of IgE production. The aim of our study was to assess whether margarine consumption is associated with allergic sensitization and diseases in children. Data of a cross-sectional health survey in 1998-1999 comprising 2,348 children age 5 to 14 yr were analyzed. Information on type of fat used as spread during the past 12 mo, children's health, and sociodemographic factors were gathered by questionnaire. Allergic sensitization to common aeroallergens was assessed by specific serum IgE. Compared with butter consumption, margarine consumption was associated with allergic sensitization (adjusted odds ratio 1.30 [95% confidence interval: 1.01 to 1.67]) and with rhinitis symptoms during the past 12 mo (1.41 [1.01 to 1.97]). Sex-stratified analysis showed that these associations were limited to boys (boys: sensitization 1.57 [1.12 to 2.20], rhinitis symptoms 1.76 [1.12 to 2.78]; girls: sensitization 0.99 [0.67 to 1.46], rhinitis symptoms 1.03 [0.63 to 1.70]). No statistically significant relation was observed between exclusive margarine consumption and ever physician-diagnosed hay fever or asthma in all children. In conclusion, the sex difference in the association of margarine consumption with allergic sensitization was in accordance with the higher IgE concentrations and atopy prevalence in boys compared with girls. Increased intake of certain polyunsaturated fatty acids might further stimulate IgE production in boys. SN - 1073-449X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11208657/full_citation L2 - http://www.atsjournals.org/doi/full/10.1164/ajrccm.163.1.2006004?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -