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Continuous low-level topical heat in the treatment of dysmenorrhea.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare the efficacy of topically applied heat for menstrual pain with oral ibuprofen and placebo treatment.

METHODS

We conducted a randomized placebo and active controlled (double dummy), parallel study using an abdominal patch (heated or unheated) for approximately 12 consecutive hours per day and oral medication (placebo or ibuprofen 400 mg) three times daily, approximately 6 hours apart for 2 consecutive days. Pain relief and pain intensity were recorded at 17 time points. There was at least 85% power to detect a true one-unit difference in the 2-day pain relief treatment means for comparisons with the unheated patch plus oral placebo group using a one-tailed test at the.05 level of significance, based on an observed within-group standard deviation of 1.147.

RESULTS

Eighty-four patients were enrolled and 81 completed the study protocol. Over the 2 days of treatment, the heated patch plus placebo tablet group (mean 3.27, P <.001), the unheated patch plus ibuprofen group (mean 3.07, P =.001), and the combination heated patch plus ibuprofen group (mean 3.55, P <.001) had significantly greater pain relief than the unheated patch plus placebo group (mean 1.95). Greater pain relief was not observed for the combination heated patch plus ibuprofen group compared with the unheated patch plus ibuprofen group (P =.096); however, the time to noticeable pain relief was statistically significantly shorter for the heated patch plus ibuprofen group (median 1.5 hours) compared with the unheated patch plus ibuprofen group (median 2.79 hours, P =.01).

CONCLUSION

Continuous low-level topical heat therapy was as effective as ibuprofen for the treatment of dysmenorrhea.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Health Quest Therapy and Research Institute, Austin, Texas, USA.

    , , , ,

    Source

    Obstetrics and gynecology 97:3 2001 Mar pg 343-9

    MeSH

    Adult
    Analgesics, Non-Narcotic
    Double-Blind Method
    Dysmenorrhea
    Female
    Hot Temperature
    Humans
    Ibuprofen
    Middle Aged
    Pain Measurement

    Pub Type(s)

    Clinical Trial
    Comparative Study
    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    11239634

    Citation

    Akin, M D., et al. "Continuous Low-level Topical Heat in the Treatment of Dysmenorrhea." Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 97, no. 3, 2001, pp. 343-9.
    Akin MD, Weingand KW, Hengehold DA, et al. Continuous low-level topical heat in the treatment of dysmenorrhea. Obstet Gynecol. 2001;97(3):343-9.
    Akin, M. D., Weingand, K. W., Hengehold, D. A., Goodale, M. B., Hinkle, R. T., & Smith, R. P. (2001). Continuous low-level topical heat in the treatment of dysmenorrhea. Obstetrics and Gynecology, 97(3), pp. 343-9.
    Akin MD, et al. Continuous Low-level Topical Heat in the Treatment of Dysmenorrhea. Obstet Gynecol. 2001;97(3):343-9. PubMed PMID: 11239634.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Continuous low-level topical heat in the treatment of dysmenorrhea. AU - Akin,M D, AU - Weingand,K W, AU - Hengehold,D A, AU - Goodale,M B, AU - Hinkle,R T, AU - Smith,R P, PY - 2001/3/10/pubmed PY - 2001/4/6/medline PY - 2001/3/10/entrez SP - 343 EP - 9 JF - Obstetrics and gynecology JO - Obstet Gynecol VL - 97 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy of topically applied heat for menstrual pain with oral ibuprofen and placebo treatment. METHODS: We conducted a randomized placebo and active controlled (double dummy), parallel study using an abdominal patch (heated or unheated) for approximately 12 consecutive hours per day and oral medication (placebo or ibuprofen 400 mg) three times daily, approximately 6 hours apart for 2 consecutive days. Pain relief and pain intensity were recorded at 17 time points. There was at least 85% power to detect a true one-unit difference in the 2-day pain relief treatment means for comparisons with the unheated patch plus oral placebo group using a one-tailed test at the.05 level of significance, based on an observed within-group standard deviation of 1.147. RESULTS: Eighty-four patients were enrolled and 81 completed the study protocol. Over the 2 days of treatment, the heated patch plus placebo tablet group (mean 3.27, P <.001), the unheated patch plus ibuprofen group (mean 3.07, P =.001), and the combination heated patch plus ibuprofen group (mean 3.55, P <.001) had significantly greater pain relief than the unheated patch plus placebo group (mean 1.95). Greater pain relief was not observed for the combination heated patch plus ibuprofen group compared with the unheated patch plus ibuprofen group (P =.096); however, the time to noticeable pain relief was statistically significantly shorter for the heated patch plus ibuprofen group (median 1.5 hours) compared with the unheated patch plus ibuprofen group (median 2.79 hours, P =.01). CONCLUSION: Continuous low-level topical heat therapy was as effective as ibuprofen for the treatment of dysmenorrhea. SN - 0029-7844 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11239634/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0029-7844(00)01163-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -