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Successful weight loss maintenance.
Annu Rev Nutr 2001; 21:323-41AR

Abstract

Obesity is now recognized as a serious chronic disease, but there is pessimism about how successful treatment can be. A general perception is that almost no one succeeds in long-term maintenance of weight loss. To define long-term weight loss success, we need an accepted definition. We propose defining successful long-term weight loss maintenance as intentionally losing at least 10% of initial body weight and keeping it off for at least 1 year. According to this definition, the picture is much more optimistic, with perhaps greater than 20% of overweight/obese persons able to achieve success. We found that in the National Weight Control Registry, successful long-term weight loss maintainers (average weight loss of 30 kg for an average of 5.5 years) share common behavioral strategies, including eating a diet low in fat, frequent self-monitoring of body weight and food intake, and high levels of regular physical activity. Weight loss maintenance may get easier over time. Once these successful maintainers have maintained a weight loss for 2-5 years, the chances of longer-term success greatly increase.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Miriam Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02906, USA. Rwing@Lifespan.orgNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11375440

Citation

Wing, R R., and J O. Hill. "Successful Weight Loss Maintenance." Annual Review of Nutrition, vol. 21, 2001, pp. 323-41.
Wing RR, Hill JO. Successful weight loss maintenance. Annu Rev Nutr. 2001;21:323-41.
Wing, R. R., & Hill, J. O. (2001). Successful weight loss maintenance. Annual Review of Nutrition, 21, pp. 323-41.
Wing RR, Hill JO. Successful Weight Loss Maintenance. Annu Rev Nutr. 2001;21:323-41. PubMed PMID: 11375440.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Successful weight loss maintenance. AU - Wing,R R, AU - Hill,J O, PY - 2001/5/26/pubmed PY - 2002/1/5/medline PY - 2001/5/26/entrez SP - 323 EP - 41 JF - Annual review of nutrition JO - Annu. Rev. Nutr. VL - 21 N2 - Obesity is now recognized as a serious chronic disease, but there is pessimism about how successful treatment can be. A general perception is that almost no one succeeds in long-term maintenance of weight loss. To define long-term weight loss success, we need an accepted definition. We propose defining successful long-term weight loss maintenance as intentionally losing at least 10% of initial body weight and keeping it off for at least 1 year. According to this definition, the picture is much more optimistic, with perhaps greater than 20% of overweight/obese persons able to achieve success. We found that in the National Weight Control Registry, successful long-term weight loss maintainers (average weight loss of 30 kg for an average of 5.5 years) share common behavioral strategies, including eating a diet low in fat, frequent self-monitoring of body weight and food intake, and high levels of regular physical activity. Weight loss maintenance may get easier over time. Once these successful maintainers have maintained a weight loss for 2-5 years, the chances of longer-term success greatly increase. SN - 0199-9885 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11375440/full_citation L2 - http://arjournals.annualreviews.org/doi/full/10.1146/annurev.nutr.21.1.323?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -