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Energy density of foods affects energy intake across multiple levels of fat content in lean and obese women.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The results of previous studies indicated that energy density, independent of fat content, influences energy intake. In most studies, however, both fat content and energy density were lower than in typical American diets.

OBJECTIVE

We examined the influence of energy density on intake when fat content was above, below, or similar to the amount of fat typically consumed and when energy density was closer to that of American diets.

DESIGN

Lean (n = 19) and obese (n = 17) women consumed all meals daily in our laboratory during 6 experimental sessions. The main entrées, consumed ad libitum, were formulated to vary in fat content (25%, 35%, and 45% of energy) and energy density (5.23 kJ/g, or low energy density, and 7.32 kJ/g, or high energy density) but to have similar palatability.

RESULTS

Energy density influenced energy intake across all fat contents in both lean and obese women (P < 0.0001). Women consumed less energy in the low (7531 kJ) than in the high (9414 kJ) energy density condition. Despite this 20% lower energy intake, there were only small differences in hunger (7%) and fullness (5%). Women consumed a similar volume, but not weight, of food daily across conditions. Differences in intake by weight, but not volume, occurred because for some versions of manipulated foods, weight and volume were not directly proportional.

CONCLUSIONS

Energy density affected energy intake across different fat contents and at levels of energy density comparable with those in typical diets. Furthermore, our findings suggest that cues related to the amount of food consumed have a greater influence on short-term intake than does the amount of energy consumed.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Nutrition Department, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park 16802-6501, USA.

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Affect
    Dietary Fats
    Energy Intake
    Female
    Humans
    Middle Aged
    Obesity
    Pain Measurement
    Satiation

    Pub Type(s)

    Clinical Trial
    Journal Article
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    11382653

    Citation

    Bell, E A., and B J. Rolls. "Energy Density of Foods Affects Energy Intake Across Multiple Levels of Fat Content in Lean and Obese Women." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 73, no. 6, 2001, pp. 1010-8.
    Bell EA, Rolls BJ. Energy density of foods affects energy intake across multiple levels of fat content in lean and obese women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2001;73(6):1010-8.
    Bell, E. A., & Rolls, B. J. (2001). Energy density of foods affects energy intake across multiple levels of fat content in lean and obese women. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 73(6), pp. 1010-8.
    Bell EA, Rolls BJ. Energy Density of Foods Affects Energy Intake Across Multiple Levels of Fat Content in Lean and Obese Women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2001;73(6):1010-8. PubMed PMID: 11382653.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Energy density of foods affects energy intake across multiple levels of fat content in lean and obese women. AU - Bell,E A, AU - Rolls,B J, PY - 2001/5/31/pubmed PY - 2001/6/22/medline PY - 2001/5/31/entrez SP - 1010 EP - 8 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 73 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: The results of previous studies indicated that energy density, independent of fat content, influences energy intake. In most studies, however, both fat content and energy density were lower than in typical American diets. OBJECTIVE: We examined the influence of energy density on intake when fat content was above, below, or similar to the amount of fat typically consumed and when energy density was closer to that of American diets. DESIGN: Lean (n = 19) and obese (n = 17) women consumed all meals daily in our laboratory during 6 experimental sessions. The main entrées, consumed ad libitum, were formulated to vary in fat content (25%, 35%, and 45% of energy) and energy density (5.23 kJ/g, or low energy density, and 7.32 kJ/g, or high energy density) but to have similar palatability. RESULTS: Energy density influenced energy intake across all fat contents in both lean and obese women (P < 0.0001). Women consumed less energy in the low (7531 kJ) than in the high (9414 kJ) energy density condition. Despite this 20% lower energy intake, there were only small differences in hunger (7%) and fullness (5%). Women consumed a similar volume, but not weight, of food daily across conditions. Differences in intake by weight, but not volume, occurred because for some versions of manipulated foods, weight and volume were not directly proportional. CONCLUSIONS: Energy density affected energy intake across different fat contents and at levels of energy density comparable with those in typical diets. Furthermore, our findings suggest that cues related to the amount of food consumed have a greater influence on short-term intake than does the amount of energy consumed. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11382653/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/73.6.1010 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -