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Vitamin supplement use and the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma among women and men.
Am J Epidemiol 2001; 153(11):1056-63AJ

Abstract

The authors examined use of individual supplements of vitamins A, C, and E only and multivitamins in relation to risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in prospective cohorts of 88,410 women in the Nurses' Health Study (1980-1996), with 261 incident cases during 16 years of follow-up, and of 47,336 men in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (1986-1996), with 111 incident cases during 10 years of follow-up. Multivitamin use was associated with a higher risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma among women but not among men; the multivariate relative risks for long-term duration (10 or more years) were 1.48 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.01, 2.16) for women and 0.85 (95% CI: 0.45, 1.58) for men. The pooled multivariate relative risk from the two cohorts was 1.18 (95% CI: 0.70, 2.02). Use of individual supplements of vitamins A, C, and E only was not associated with risk among men. An increased risk associated with the use of individual supplements of vitamins A, C, and E only among women appeared to be secondary to the use of multivitamins by the same persons. Because an elevated risk among multivitamin users was not observed consistently in the two cohorts and the pooled data were not significant, the elevated risk among women may be the result of chance.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Shumin.Zhang@channing.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11390323

Citation

Zhang, S M., et al. "Vitamin Supplement Use and the Risk of non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Among Women and Men." American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 153, no. 11, 2001, pp. 1056-63.
Zhang SM, Giovannucci EL, Hunter DJ, et al. Vitamin supplement use and the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma among women and men. Am J Epidemiol. 2001;153(11):1056-63.
Zhang, S. M., Giovannucci, E. L., Hunter, D. J., Rimm, E. B., Ascherio, A., Colditz, G. A., ... Willett, W. C. (2001). Vitamin supplement use and the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma among women and men. American Journal of Epidemiology, 153(11), pp. 1056-63.
Zhang SM, et al. Vitamin Supplement Use and the Risk of non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Among Women and Men. Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Jun 1;153(11):1056-63. PubMed PMID: 11390323.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin supplement use and the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma among women and men. AU - Zhang,S M, AU - Giovannucci,E L, AU - Hunter,D J, AU - Rimm,E B, AU - Ascherio,A, AU - Colditz,G A, AU - Speizer,F E, AU - Willett,W C, PY - 2001/6/8/pubmed PY - 2001/6/22/medline PY - 2001/6/8/entrez SP - 1056 EP - 63 JF - American journal of epidemiology JO - Am. J. Epidemiol. VL - 153 IS - 11 N2 - The authors examined use of individual supplements of vitamins A, C, and E only and multivitamins in relation to risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in prospective cohorts of 88,410 women in the Nurses' Health Study (1980-1996), with 261 incident cases during 16 years of follow-up, and of 47,336 men in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (1986-1996), with 111 incident cases during 10 years of follow-up. Multivitamin use was associated with a higher risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma among women but not among men; the multivariate relative risks for long-term duration (10 or more years) were 1.48 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.01, 2.16) for women and 0.85 (95% CI: 0.45, 1.58) for men. The pooled multivariate relative risk from the two cohorts was 1.18 (95% CI: 0.70, 2.02). Use of individual supplements of vitamins A, C, and E only was not associated with risk among men. An increased risk associated with the use of individual supplements of vitamins A, C, and E only among women appeared to be secondary to the use of multivitamins by the same persons. Because an elevated risk among multivitamin users was not observed consistently in the two cohorts and the pooled data were not significant, the elevated risk among women may be the result of chance. SN - 0002-9262 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11390323/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/aje/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/aje/153.11.1056 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -