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Low iron status and enhanced insulin sensitivity in lacto-ovo vegetarians.
Br J Nutr 2001; 86(4):515-9BJ

Abstract

The efficacy of insulin in stimulating whole-body glucose disposal (insulin sensitivity) was quantified using direct methodology in thirty lacto-ovo vegetarians and in thirty meat-eaters. All subjects were adult, lean (BMI <23 kg/m2), healthy and glucose tolerant. Lacto-ovo vegetarians were more insulin sensitive than meat-eaters, with a steady-state plasma glucose (mmol/l) of 4.1 (95 % CI 3.5, 5.0) v. 6.9 (95 % CI 5.2, 7.5; respectively. In addition, lacto-ovo vegetarians had lower body Fe stores, as indicated by a serum ferritin concentration (microg/l) of 35 (95 % CI 21, 49) compared with 72 (95 % CI 45, 100) for meat-eaters To test whether or not Fe status might modulate insulin sensitivity, body Fe was lowered by phlebotomy in six male meat-eaters to levels similar to that seen in vegetarians, with a resultant approximately 40 % enhancement of insulin-mediated glucose disposal Our results demonstrate that lacto-ovo vegetarians are more insulin sensitive and have lower Fe stores than meat-eaters. In addition, it seems that reduced insulin sensitivity in meat-eaters is amenable to improvement by reducing body Fe. The latter finding is in agreement with results from animal studies where, no matter how induced, Fe depletion consistently enhanced glucose disposal.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, San Francisco General Hospital, San Francisco, CA, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11591239

Citation

Hua, N W., et al. "Low Iron Status and Enhanced Insulin Sensitivity in Lacto-ovo Vegetarians." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 86, no. 4, 2001, pp. 515-9.
Hua NW, Stoohs RA, Facchini FS. Low iron status and enhanced insulin sensitivity in lacto-ovo vegetarians. Br J Nutr. 2001;86(4):515-9.
Hua, N. W., Stoohs, R. A., & Facchini, F. S. (2001). Low iron status and enhanced insulin sensitivity in lacto-ovo vegetarians. The British Journal of Nutrition, 86(4), pp. 515-9.
Hua NW, Stoohs RA, Facchini FS. Low Iron Status and Enhanced Insulin Sensitivity in Lacto-ovo Vegetarians. Br J Nutr. 2001;86(4):515-9. PubMed PMID: 11591239.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Low iron status and enhanced insulin sensitivity in lacto-ovo vegetarians. AU - Hua,N W, AU - Stoohs,R A, AU - Facchini,F S, PY - 2001/10/10/pubmed PY - 2002/1/5/medline PY - 2001/10/10/entrez SP - 515 EP - 9 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. VL - 86 IS - 4 N2 - The efficacy of insulin in stimulating whole-body glucose disposal (insulin sensitivity) was quantified using direct methodology in thirty lacto-ovo vegetarians and in thirty meat-eaters. All subjects were adult, lean (BMI <23 kg/m2), healthy and glucose tolerant. Lacto-ovo vegetarians were more insulin sensitive than meat-eaters, with a steady-state plasma glucose (mmol/l) of 4.1 (95 % CI 3.5, 5.0) v. 6.9 (95 % CI 5.2, 7.5; respectively. In addition, lacto-ovo vegetarians had lower body Fe stores, as indicated by a serum ferritin concentration (microg/l) of 35 (95 % CI 21, 49) compared with 72 (95 % CI 45, 100) for meat-eaters To test whether or not Fe status might modulate insulin sensitivity, body Fe was lowered by phlebotomy in six male meat-eaters to levels similar to that seen in vegetarians, with a resultant approximately 40 % enhancement of insulin-mediated glucose disposal Our results demonstrate that lacto-ovo vegetarians are more insulin sensitive and have lower Fe stores than meat-eaters. In addition, it seems that reduced insulin sensitivity in meat-eaters is amenable to improvement by reducing body Fe. The latter finding is in agreement with results from animal studies where, no matter how induced, Fe depletion consistently enhanced glucose disposal. SN - 0007-1145 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11591239/full_citation L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114501002203/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -