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Macular pigment density is reduced in obese subjects.

Abstract

PURPOSE

Because of the potential protective function of lutein (L) and zeaxanthin (Z) within the retina and lens, a better understanding of factors influencing tissue deposition is needed. The largest fractions of L and Z are stored in adipose tissue. Thus, higher body fat content and body mass index (BMI) may be expected to influence the quantities of L and Z in the retina (measured as macular pigment optical density, MPOD).

METHODS

Six hundred eighty subjects were tested. Information on MPOD, body mass index (BMI), body fat percentage (n = 400, using bioelectric impedance), dietary intake (n = 280, using a food frequency questionnaire), and serum carotenoid content (n = 280, using reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography) was obtained.

RESULTS

There was an inverse relationship between MPOD and BMI (n = 680, r = -0.12, P < 0.0008) and between MPOD and body fat percentage (n = 400, r = -0.12, P < 0.01). These relationships were largely driven by data from the subjects with higher BMI (more than 29, 21% less MP) and higher body fat percentage (more than 27%, 16% less MP). Dietary carotenoid intake and serum carotenoid levels were also lower in subjects with higher BMI (n = 280).

CONCLUSIONS

Obese subjects tend to have lower retinal L and Z. This reduction may be due to decreased dietary intake of L and Z and/or competition between retina and adipose tissue for uptake of L and Z.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Vision Science Laboratory, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602, USA. bhammond@egon.psy.uga.edu

    ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adipose Tissue
    Adult
    Anthropometry
    Body Mass Index
    Carotenoids
    Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
    Electric Impedance
    Energy Intake
    Feeding Behavior
    Female
    Humans
    Lutein
    Male
    Obesity
    Retina
    Retinal Pigments
    Xanthophylls
    Zeaxanthins
    beta Carotene

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    11773011

    Citation

    Hammond, Billy R., et al. "Macular Pigment Density Is Reduced in Obese Subjects." Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, vol. 43, no. 1, 2002, pp. 47-50.
    Hammond BR, Ciulla TA, Snodderly DM. Macular pigment density is reduced in obese subjects. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2002;43(1):47-50.
    Hammond, B. R., Ciulla, T. A., & Snodderly, D. M. (2002). Macular pigment density is reduced in obese subjects. Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, 43(1), pp. 47-50.
    Hammond BR, Ciulla TA, Snodderly DM. Macular Pigment Density Is Reduced in Obese Subjects. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2002;43(1):47-50. PubMed PMID: 11773011.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Macular pigment density is reduced in obese subjects. AU - Hammond,Billy R,Jr AU - Ciulla,Thomas A, AU - Snodderly,D Max, PY - 2002/1/5/pubmed PY - 2002/1/29/medline PY - 2002/1/5/entrez SP - 47 EP - 50 JF - Investigative ophthalmology & visual science JO - Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. VL - 43 IS - 1 N2 - PURPOSE: Because of the potential protective function of lutein (L) and zeaxanthin (Z) within the retina and lens, a better understanding of factors influencing tissue deposition is needed. The largest fractions of L and Z are stored in adipose tissue. Thus, higher body fat content and body mass index (BMI) may be expected to influence the quantities of L and Z in the retina (measured as macular pigment optical density, MPOD). METHODS: Six hundred eighty subjects were tested. Information on MPOD, body mass index (BMI), body fat percentage (n = 400, using bioelectric impedance), dietary intake (n = 280, using a food frequency questionnaire), and serum carotenoid content (n = 280, using reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography) was obtained. RESULTS: There was an inverse relationship between MPOD and BMI (n = 680, r = -0.12, P < 0.0008) and between MPOD and body fat percentage (n = 400, r = -0.12, P < 0.01). These relationships were largely driven by data from the subjects with higher BMI (more than 29, 21% less MP) and higher body fat percentage (more than 27%, 16% less MP). Dietary carotenoid intake and serum carotenoid levels were also lower in subjects with higher BMI (n = 280). CONCLUSIONS: Obese subjects tend to have lower retinal L and Z. This reduction may be due to decreased dietary intake of L and Z and/or competition between retina and adipose tissue for uptake of L and Z. SN - 0146-0404 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11773011/full_citation L2 - http://iovs.arvojournals.org/article.aspx?volume=43&amp;page=47 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -