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Macular pigment density is reduced in obese subjects.
Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2002; 43(1):47-50IO

Abstract

PURPOSE

Because of the potential protective function of lutein (L) and zeaxanthin (Z) within the retina and lens, a better understanding of factors influencing tissue deposition is needed. The largest fractions of L and Z are stored in adipose tissue. Thus, higher body fat content and body mass index (BMI) may be expected to influence the quantities of L and Z in the retina (measured as macular pigment optical density, MPOD).

METHODS

Six hundred eighty subjects were tested. Information on MPOD, body mass index (BMI), body fat percentage (n = 400, using bioelectric impedance), dietary intake (n = 280, using a food frequency questionnaire), and serum carotenoid content (n = 280, using reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography) was obtained.

RESULTS

There was an inverse relationship between MPOD and BMI (n = 680, r = -0.12, P < 0.0008) and between MPOD and body fat percentage (n = 400, r = -0.12, P < 0.01). These relationships were largely driven by data from the subjects with higher BMI (more than 29, 21% less MP) and higher body fat percentage (more than 27%, 16% less MP). Dietary carotenoid intake and serum carotenoid levels were also lower in subjects with higher BMI (n = 280).

CONCLUSIONS

Obese subjects tend to have lower retinal L and Z. This reduction may be due to decreased dietary intake of L and Z and/or competition between retina and adipose tissue for uptake of L and Z.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Vision Science Laboratory, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602, USA. bhammond@egon.psy.uga.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11773011

Citation

Hammond, Billy R., et al. "Macular Pigment Density Is Reduced in Obese Subjects." Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, vol. 43, no. 1, 2002, pp. 47-50.
Hammond BR, Ciulla TA, Snodderly DM. Macular pigment density is reduced in obese subjects. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2002;43(1):47-50.
Hammond, B. R., Ciulla, T. A., & Snodderly, D. M. (2002). Macular pigment density is reduced in obese subjects. Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, 43(1), pp. 47-50.
Hammond BR, Ciulla TA, Snodderly DM. Macular Pigment Density Is Reduced in Obese Subjects. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2002;43(1):47-50. PubMed PMID: 11773011.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Macular pigment density is reduced in obese subjects. AU - Hammond,Billy R,Jr AU - Ciulla,Thomas A, AU - Snodderly,D Max, PY - 2002/1/5/pubmed PY - 2002/1/29/medline PY - 2002/1/5/entrez SP - 47 EP - 50 JF - Investigative ophthalmology & visual science JO - Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. VL - 43 IS - 1 N2 - PURPOSE: Because of the potential protective function of lutein (L) and zeaxanthin (Z) within the retina and lens, a better understanding of factors influencing tissue deposition is needed. The largest fractions of L and Z are stored in adipose tissue. Thus, higher body fat content and body mass index (BMI) may be expected to influence the quantities of L and Z in the retina (measured as macular pigment optical density, MPOD). METHODS: Six hundred eighty subjects were tested. Information on MPOD, body mass index (BMI), body fat percentage (n = 400, using bioelectric impedance), dietary intake (n = 280, using a food frequency questionnaire), and serum carotenoid content (n = 280, using reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography) was obtained. RESULTS: There was an inverse relationship between MPOD and BMI (n = 680, r = -0.12, P < 0.0008) and between MPOD and body fat percentage (n = 400, r = -0.12, P < 0.01). These relationships were largely driven by data from the subjects with higher BMI (more than 29, 21% less MP) and higher body fat percentage (more than 27%, 16% less MP). Dietary carotenoid intake and serum carotenoid levels were also lower in subjects with higher BMI (n = 280). CONCLUSIONS: Obese subjects tend to have lower retinal L and Z. This reduction may be due to decreased dietary intake of L and Z and/or competition between retina and adipose tissue for uptake of L and Z. SN - 0146-0404 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11773011/full_citation L2 - http://iovs.arvojournals.org/article.aspx?volume=43&amp;page=47 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -