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Association between infantile colic and carbohydrate malabsorption from fruit juices in infancy.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether infantile colic (IC) is associated with malabsorption of carbohydrates present in fruit juices.

METHODS

In this double-blind study, parents of 30 healthy infants (5.1 +/- 0.7 months, 7.4 +/- 1.0 kg, 64 +/- 4 cm) were administered a questionnaire to quantitatively assess IC. Thereafter, they were divided into 2 groups, 16 infants with and 14 without IC. Within each treatment group infants were fed 120 mL (16.3 +/- 2.0 mL/kg) of either white grape (sorbitol-free; 1:1 fructose-to-glucose ratio) or apple (sorbitol 0.5 g/dL; 2.6:1 fructose-to-glucose ratio) juice. Physical activity (PA), energy expenditure (EE), crying, and sleeping times were measured for 0.5 and 3.0 hours before and after juice feeding, respectively, using the Enhanced Metabolic Testing Activity Chamber. Carbohydrate malabsorption was determined by breath hydrogen (BH(2)) gas analysis after juice feedings. Statistical differences between groups were determined by 2-way analysis of variance with the Tukey procedure.

RESULTS

Infants with IC fed apple juice exhibited carbohydrate malabsorption as shown by increased BH(2) excretion, whereas those without IC absorbed carbohydrates normally when fed this juice. Infants fed apple juice with carbohydrate malabsorption cried more and consequently slept less during the last 1.5 hours of the study. This was associated with increased PA and EE as compared with infants without IC fed apple juice. In contrast, infants fed white grape juice, regardless of IC, showed no increase in BH(2) excretion, PA, and EE. Furthermore, crying and sleeping times were unchanged in infants fed white grape juice regardless of the presence or absence of IC.

CONCLUSIONS

IC was associated with carbohydrate malabsorption from fruit juices containing sorbitol and a high fructose-to-glucose ratio.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Research Institute, Miami Children's Hospital, Miami, Florida 33155, USA.

    , ,

    Source

    Pediatrics 109:5 2002 May pg 797-805

    MeSH

    Analysis of Variance
    Beverages
    Breath Tests
    Carbohydrate Metabolism
    Colic
    Crying
    Double-Blind Method
    Energy Metabolism
    Fructose
    Fruit
    Glucose
    Humans
    Hydrogen
    Infant
    Malabsorption Syndromes
    Parents
    Physical Exertion
    Sleep
    Sorbitol
    Surveys and Questionnaires

    Pub Type(s)

    Clinical Trial
    Controlled Clinical Trial
    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    11986439

    Citation

    Duro, Debora, et al. "Association Between Infantile Colic and Carbohydrate Malabsorption From Fruit Juices in Infancy." Pediatrics, vol. 109, no. 5, 2002, pp. 797-805.
    Duro D, Rising R, Cedillo M, et al. Association between infantile colic and carbohydrate malabsorption from fruit juices in infancy. Pediatrics. 2002;109(5):797-805.
    Duro, D., Rising, R., Cedillo, M., & Lifshitz, F. (2002). Association between infantile colic and carbohydrate malabsorption from fruit juices in infancy. Pediatrics, 109(5), pp. 797-805.
    Duro D, et al. Association Between Infantile Colic and Carbohydrate Malabsorption From Fruit Juices in Infancy. Pediatrics. 2002;109(5):797-805. PubMed PMID: 11986439.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Association between infantile colic and carbohydrate malabsorption from fruit juices in infancy. AU - Duro,Debora, AU - Rising,Russell, AU - Cedillo,Maribel, AU - Lifshitz,Fima, PY - 2002/5/3/pubmed PY - 2002/5/25/medline PY - 2002/5/3/entrez SP - 797 EP - 805 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 109 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine whether infantile colic (IC) is associated with malabsorption of carbohydrates present in fruit juices. METHODS: In this double-blind study, parents of 30 healthy infants (5.1 +/- 0.7 months, 7.4 +/- 1.0 kg, 64 +/- 4 cm) were administered a questionnaire to quantitatively assess IC. Thereafter, they were divided into 2 groups, 16 infants with and 14 without IC. Within each treatment group infants were fed 120 mL (16.3 +/- 2.0 mL/kg) of either white grape (sorbitol-free; 1:1 fructose-to-glucose ratio) or apple (sorbitol 0.5 g/dL; 2.6:1 fructose-to-glucose ratio) juice. Physical activity (PA), energy expenditure (EE), crying, and sleeping times were measured for 0.5 and 3.0 hours before and after juice feeding, respectively, using the Enhanced Metabolic Testing Activity Chamber. Carbohydrate malabsorption was determined by breath hydrogen (BH(2)) gas analysis after juice feedings. Statistical differences between groups were determined by 2-way analysis of variance with the Tukey procedure. RESULTS: Infants with IC fed apple juice exhibited carbohydrate malabsorption as shown by increased BH(2) excretion, whereas those without IC absorbed carbohydrates normally when fed this juice. Infants fed apple juice with carbohydrate malabsorption cried more and consequently slept less during the last 1.5 hours of the study. This was associated with increased PA and EE as compared with infants without IC fed apple juice. In contrast, infants fed white grape juice, regardless of IC, showed no increase in BH(2) excretion, PA, and EE. Furthermore, crying and sleeping times were unchanged in infants fed white grape juice regardless of the presence or absence of IC. CONCLUSIONS: IC was associated with carbohydrate malabsorption from fruit juices containing sorbitol and a high fructose-to-glucose ratio. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11986439/full_citation L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=11986439 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -