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Physical training for cystic fibrosis.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2002; (2):CD002768CD

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Physical training may form an important part of the care package for patients with cystic fibrosis.

OBJECTIVES

To determine whether a prescribed regime of physical training produces improvement or prevents deterioration in physiological and clinical outcomes in cystic fibrosis compared to no training.

SEARCH STRATEGY

We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group specialist trials register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearching relevant journals and handsearching abstract books of conference proceedings. Date of the most recent search: August 2001.

SELECTION CRITERIA

All randomised controlled clinical trials in which a prescribed regime of physical training is compared to no physical training in patients with cystic fibrosis.

DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS

Two reviewers independently selected trials for inclusion, assessed methodological quality and extracted data.

MAIN RESULTS

Of the sixteen trials identified six trials, which included 184 patients, met the inclusion criteria. Exercise tolerance in the short term, during an acute admission was improved in patients who received physical training. In a three year study there was no improvement in exercise tolerance at the end of the study period. Over three years there was a significantly greater mean annual rate of decline in FVC in the control group compared to the exercise group WMD 2.17 (95%CI 0.47, 3.87). Changes in other lung function parameters showed a similar trend, but these were not statistically significant.

REVIEWER'S CONCLUSIONS

Conclusions about the efficacy of physical training in cystic fibrosis are limited by the small size, short duration and incomplete reporting of most of the trials included in this review. Physical training is already part of the care package offered to most patients with cystic fibrosis and there is no evidence to actively discourage this. Further research is needed to assess comprehensively the net benefit of the addition of physical training to the care of cystic fibrosis patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Physiotherapy Department, University of Ulster and Belfast City Hospital, 14J02, Shore Road, Newtownabbey, Northern Ireland, UK, BT37 0QB. jm.bradley@ulst.ac.ukNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12076449

Citation

Bradley, J, and F Moran. "Physical Training for Cystic Fibrosis." The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2002, p. CD002768.
Bradley J, Moran F. Physical training for cystic fibrosis. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2002.
Bradley, J., & Moran, F. (2002). Physical training for cystic fibrosis. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, (2), p. CD002768.
Bradley J, Moran F. Physical Training for Cystic Fibrosis. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2002;(2)CD002768. PubMed PMID: 12076449.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Physical training for cystic fibrosis. AU - Bradley,J, AU - Moran,F, PY - 2002/6/22/pubmed PY - 2002/8/10/medline PY - 2002/6/22/entrez SP - CD002768 EP - CD002768 JF - The Cochrane database of systematic reviews JO - Cochrane Database Syst Rev IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Physical training may form an important part of the care package for patients with cystic fibrosis. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether a prescribed regime of physical training produces improvement or prevents deterioration in physiological and clinical outcomes in cystic fibrosis compared to no training. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group specialist trials register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearching relevant journals and handsearching abstract books of conference proceedings. Date of the most recent search: August 2001. SELECTION CRITERIA: All randomised controlled clinical trials in which a prescribed regime of physical training is compared to no physical training in patients with cystic fibrosis. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two reviewers independently selected trials for inclusion, assessed methodological quality and extracted data. MAIN RESULTS: Of the sixteen trials identified six trials, which included 184 patients, met the inclusion criteria. Exercise tolerance in the short term, during an acute admission was improved in patients who received physical training. In a three year study there was no improvement in exercise tolerance at the end of the study period. Over three years there was a significantly greater mean annual rate of decline in FVC in the control group compared to the exercise group WMD 2.17 (95%CI 0.47, 3.87). Changes in other lung function parameters showed a similar trend, but these were not statistically significant. REVIEWER'S CONCLUSIONS: Conclusions about the efficacy of physical training in cystic fibrosis are limited by the small size, short duration and incomplete reporting of most of the trials included in this review. Physical training is already part of the care package offered to most patients with cystic fibrosis and there is no evidence to actively discourage this. Further research is needed to assess comprehensively the net benefit of the addition of physical training to the care of cystic fibrosis patients. SN - 1469-493X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12076449/full_citation L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD002768 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -